Book Image

CompTIA Project+ Study Guide: Exam PK0-004 - Second Edition

By : Kim Heldman
Book Image

CompTIA Project+ Study Guide: Exam PK0-004 - Second Edition

By: Kim Heldman

Overview of this book

The CompTIA Project+ Study Guide, Second Edition is your comprehensive resource for taking Exam PK0-004. With 100% coverage of all exam objectives, this book gives you everything you need to approach the exam with confidence. Detailed explanations and superior study tools cover and reinforce setup, initiation, planning, execution, delivery, change, control, communication, and closure, and the author Kim Heldman's twenty-five years of project management experience provide deep insight into real-world applications. The book contains detailed explanations and superior study tools that cover and reinforce all the exam objectives. You’ll begin by tackling questions related to pre-project setup and project initiation. Then you’ll solve questions about creating a project charter and planning it. You’ll also take questions about developing schedules and budgets and project execution. The later chapters provide questions on managing change, control, and communication. Finally, you’ll be given questions on project closure. By the end of the book, you’ll have the knowledge you need to be confident on exam day.
Table of Contents (17 chapters)
Free Chapter
1
Acknowledgments
2
About the Author
15
Advert
16
EULA

Receiving a Project Request

Most projects start with an idea. The idea generates a project request, which typically starts with a business case, and the process to review and authorize the project begins. You’ve already learned about identifying the project, developing the business case, validating the business case, and using project selection techniques in Chapter 1. Now you’ll learn about the project request process and documenting the high-level scope definition and the high-level project requirements.

The Project Request Process

The project request process can be formal or informal, depending on the organization. You may have a process that requires a formal written document describing the project goals and justification, or you may experience what I like to call drive-bys—the project your boss tells you about in the 30-second elevator ride to the lobby. Regardless of who initiates a project request or how it’s initiated, the organization must review...