Book Image

After Action Review: Continuous Improvement Made Easy

By : Artie Mahal
Book Image

After Action Review: Continuous Improvement Made Easy

By: Artie Mahal

Overview of this book

Even if we're not consciously aware of it, we're constantly seeking improvement. This continual quest for improvement begins when you start differentiating between "what was" and "what could be." Through this book, you’ll learn how to apply both informal and formal continuous improvement approaches to reflect upon and analyze your individual work or the work of your team. The book begins by covering the basic facilitation skills that you'll need to conduct an AAR. These skills include active listening, questioning, information gathering and analysis, managing group dynamics, and more. You'll dive deep into the AAR technique and explore all its aspects in detail including its value proposition and frameworks. As you progress through the book, you'll explore the informal and formal approaches to AAR and understand the situations where each can be used. By the end of the book, you’ll be able to apply this technique and its fundamentals to assess the improve the outcome of your project you undertake or a life event.
Table of Contents (8 chapters)

Creating an honorable close to the workshop

Occasionally a work session may not go as planned. Due to various reasons, the session agenda may have to be drastically changed and even canceled by the manager or the sponsor. In such cases, the facilitator must always re-contract the agenda activities with the workshop manager/sponsor to accommodate any changes they might wish. The changed agenda may call for ending the workshop. If this occurs, the facilitator must begin wrapping up the closing items of the agenda (such as Next Steps, Communication Plan, and follow-up documentation).

Then thank the participants, and allow the manager or sponsor to formally close the workshop. This is an honorable way of wrapping up a session where unexpected issues cause it not to proceed further. Remember, the facilitator is responsible for the process and context, not the content. In conclusion, of this chapter, let me share with you The Facilitator’s Mantra inspired by my colleague Vince...