Book Image

Fixing Bad UX Designs

By : Lisandra Maioli
Book Image

Fixing Bad UX Designs

By: Lisandra Maioli

Overview of this book

Have your web applications been experiencing more hits and less conversions? Are bad designs consuming your time and money? This book is the answer to these problems. With intuitive case studies, you’ll learn to simplify, fix, and enhance some common, real-world application designs. You’ll look at the common issues of simplicity, navigation, appearance, maintenance, and many more. The challenge that most UX designers face is to ensure that the UX is user-friendly. In this book, we address this with individual case studies starting with some common UX applications and then move on to complex applications. Each case study will help you understand the issues faced by a bad UX and teach you to break it down and fix these problems. As we progress, you’ll learn about the information architecture, usability testing, iteration, UX refactoring, and many other related features with the help of various case studies. You’ll also learn some interesting UX design tools with the projects covered in the book. By the end of the book, you’ll be armed with the knowledge to fix bad UX designs and to ensure great customer satisfaction for your applications.
Table of Contents (14 chapters)

Understanding users and their needs

Remember that designing an effective user experience requires an understanding of the needs of both the business and users, and designing a solution that meets them. So far, you should understand what the business goals are for your UX project. Now, it's time to understand the project from the user's point of view.

Make sure to have listed all the problems (and symptoms) raised during your stakeholder interviews. I like to have them on post-it notes on my wall. In this way, I can group and regroup them in order to find the main issues and problems that I have to check out. You will probably notice that during the user research, you might find other problems or find out that problems listed before were actually symptoms of another problem. For example, the high cart abandonment rate might be a symptom of difficulty in finding the next...