Book Image

Nagios Core Administration Cookbook - Second Edition

By : Tom Ryder
Book Image

Nagios Core Administration Cookbook - Second Edition

By: Tom Ryder

Overview of this book

Nagios Core is an open source monitoring framework suitable for any network that ensures both internal and customer-facing services are running correctly and manages notification and reporting behavior to diagnose and fix outages promptly. It allows very fine configuration of exactly when, where, what, and how to check network services to meet both the uptime goals of your network and systems team and the needs of your users. This book shows system and network administrators how to use Nagios Core to its fullest as a monitoring framework for checks on any kind of network services, from the smallest home network to much larger production multi-site services. You will discover that Nagios Core is capable of doing much more than pinging a host or to see whether websites respond. The recipes in this book will demonstrate how to leverage Nagios Core's advanced configuration, scripting hooks, reports, data retrieval, and extensibility to integrate it with your existing systems, and to make it the rock-solid center of your network monitoring world.
Table of Contents (18 chapters)
Nagios Core Administration Cookbook Second Edition
Credits
About the Author
About the Reviewer
www.PacktPub.com
Preface
Index

Creating a new servicegroup


In this recipe, we'll create a new servicegroup. This allows us to make meaningful groups out of a set of arbitrary services so that we can view the status of all those services in a separate part of the web administration area.

Getting ready

You should have a working Nagios Core 4.0 or better server running with a web interface.

You should also have at least two defined services that form a meaningful group; perhaps they're similar kinds of services, such as mail services, are monitored by the same team, or they are both on the same set of servers at a physical location.

In this example, we have three servers performing mail functions: smtp.example.net, pop3.example.net, and imap.example.net, running an SMTP, POP3, and IMAP daemon, respectively. All three of the hosts are set up in Nagios Core, and so are their services. We're going to add them into a new servicegroup called mailservices.

Here are the definitions of the hosts and services used in this example, so you can see how everything fits together:

define host {
    use                 linux-server
    host_name           smtp.example.net
    alias               smtp
    address             192.0.2.31
    hostgroups          webservers
}
    define service {
        use                  generic-service
        host_name            smtp.example.net
        service_description  SMTP
        check_command        check_smtp
    }
define host {
    use                 linux-server
    host_name           pop3.example.net
    alias               pop3
    address             192.0.2.32
    hostgroups          webservers
}
    define service {
        use                  generic-service
        host_name            pop3.example.net
        service_description  POP3
        check_command        check_pop
    }
define host {
    use                 linux-server
    host_name           imap.example.net
    alias               imap
    address             192.0.2.33
    hostgroups          webservers
}
    define service {
        use                  generic-service
        host_name            imap.example.net
        service_description  IMAP
        check_command        check_imap
    }

How to do it...

We can add our new servicegroup with the following steps:

  1. Change to our Nagios Core configuration objects directory and edit a new file called servicegroups.cfg:

    # cd /usr/local/nagios/etc/objects
    # vi servicegroups.cfg
    
  2. Add the following definition to the new file, substituting the values in bold with your own values:

    define servicegroup {
        servicegroup_name  mailservices
        alias              Mail services
    }
  3. Move a directory up and then edit the nagios.cfg file:

    # cd ..
    # vi nagios.cfg
    
  4. Add this line to the end of the file:

    cfg_file=/usr/local/nagios/etc/objects/servicegroups.cfg
  5. For each of the services we want to add to the group, find their definitions and add a servicegroups directive to put them into the new servicegroup. The definitions may end up looking something like this:

    define service {
        use                  generic-service
        host_name            smtp.example.net
        service_description  SMTP
        check_command        check_smtp
        servicegroups        mailservices
    }
    define service {
        use                  generic-service
        host_name            pop3.example.net
        service_description  POP3
        check_command        check_pop
        servicegroups        mailservices
    }
    define service {
        use                  generic-service
        host_name            imap.example.net
        service_description  IMAP
        check_command        check_imap
        servicegroups        mailservices
    }
  6. Restart Nagios using the following command:

    # /etc/init.d/nagios reload
    

We should now be able to visit the Service Groups section of the web interface and see a new servicegroup with three members:

How it works...

The configuration we've added in the preceding section includes a new file with a new servicegroup into the Nagios Core configuration and inserts appropriate services into the group. The servicegroup creates a separate section in the web interface for us to get a quick overview of only the services in that particular group.

There's more...

The way we've added services to the preceding groups is not the only way to do it. If we prefer, we can instead name the services (and their applicable hosts) for the group inside the group definition using the members directive, so we could have something like the following:

define servicegroup {
    servicegroup_name  mailservices
    alias              Mail services
    members            smtp.example.net,SMTP,pop3.example.net,POP3,imap.example.net,IMAP
}

Note that we need to specify both the host that the service is on and the services to be monitored on it. This string needs to be comma-separated. The hostname always comes first, but it can be followed by any number of its services that are to be monitored.

This allows us to make a servicegroup that always includes every single service on every host, if we find that useful:

define servicegroup {
    servicegroup_name  all
    alias              All services
    members            *
}

If we're going to use servicegroup definitions extensively in our Nagios Core configuration to add services to groups, we should use whichever of the two methods we think is going to be easiest for us to maintain.

It's worth noting that a service can be in more than one group and there is no limit on the number of groups we can declare, so we can afford to be quite liberal with how we group our services into any sort of useful categories. A few examples of this could be organizing services by the appropriate contact for their notifications, internal functions, or customer-facing functions.

See also

  • The Creating a new service section in this chapter

  • The Running a service on all hosts in a group section in this chapter

  • Using inheritance to simplify a configuration, Chapter 9, Managing Configuration