Book Image

Windows 10 for Enterprise Administrators

By : Richard Diver, Manuel Singer, Jeff Stokes
Book Image

Windows 10 for Enterprise Administrators

By: Richard Diver, Manuel Singer, Jeff Stokes

Overview of this book

Microsoft's launch of Windows 10 is a step toward satisfying enterprise administrators' needs for management and user experience customization. This book provides enterprise administrators with the knowledge needed to fully utilize the advanced feature set of Windows 10 Enterprise. This practical guide shows Windows 10 from an administrator's point of view. You'll focus on areas such as installation and configuration techniques based on your enterprise requirements, various deployment scenarios and management strategies, and setting up and managing admin and other user accounts. You'll see how to configure Remote Server Administration Tools to remotely manage Windows Server and Azure Active Directory. Lastly, you will learn modern mobile device management for effective BYOD and how to enable enhanced data protection, system hardening, and enterprise-level security with the new Windows 10 in order to prevent data breaches and to impede attacks. By the end of this book, you will know the key technologies and capabilities in Windows 10 and will confidently be able to manage and deploy these features in your organization.
Table of Contents (11 chapters)

Conventions

In this book, you will find a number of text styles that distinguish between different kinds of information. Here are some examples of these styles and an explanation of their meaning. Code words in text, database table names, folder names, filenames, file extensions, pathnames, dummy URLs, user input, and Twitter handles are shown as follows: "Make a directory called C:\temp".

A block of code is set as follows:

if ($predefined) {
$predefined.Enabled = 1;
$predefined.Put() | Out-Null;
Write-Host Enabled $Id
}

Any command-line input or output is written as follows:

export-startlayout -path c:\temp\customstartscreenlayout.xml –verbose

New terms and important words are shown in bold. Words that you see on the screen, for example, in menus or dialog boxes, appear in the text like this: "Users can manage their own sign in preferences by going to Start | Settings | Accounts | Sign-in options and selecting the options you prefer."

Warnings or important notes appear like this.
Tips and tricks appear like this.