Book Image

SELinux System Administration. - Second Edition

Book Image

SELinux System Administration. - Second Edition

Overview of this book

Do you have the crucial job of protecting your private and company systems from malicious attacks and undefined application behavior? Are you looking to secure your Linux systems with improved access controls? Look no further, intrepid administrator! This book will show you how to enhance your system’s secure state across Linux distributions, helping you keep application vulnerabilities at bay. This book covers the core SELinux concepts and shows you how to leverage SELinux to improve the protection measures of a Linux system. You will learn the SELinux fundamentals and all of SELinux’s configuration handles including conditional policies, constraints, policy types, and audit capabilities. These topics are paired with genuine examples of situations and issues you may come across as an administrator. In addition, you will learn how to further harden the virtualization offering of both libvirt (sVirt) and Docker through SELinux. By the end of the book you will know how SELinux works and how you can tune it to meet your needs.
Table of Contents (16 chapters)
SELinux System Administration - Second Edition
Credits
About the Author
About the Reviewers
www.PacktPub.com
Preface

Service support in systemd


The main capability of the system daemon that most people know is its support for system services. Unlike the traditional SysV-compatible init systems, systemd does not use scripts to manage services. Instead, it uses a declarative approach for the various services, documenting the wanted state and configuration parameters while using its own logic to ensure that the right set of services is started in due time.

Understanding unit files

Systemd uses unit files to declare how a service should behave. These unit files use the INI-style syntax, supporting sections and key/value pairs within each file. A service can have multiple unit files that influence the service at large. It is important to remember that different unit files for the same service are all related:

  • The *.service unit files define how a system service should be launched, what its dependencies are, how systemd should treat sudden failures, and so on.

  • The *.socket unit files define which socket(s) should...