Book Image

Real-World SRE

By : Nat Welch
Book Image

Real-World SRE

By: Nat Welch

Overview of this book

Real-World SRE is the go-to survival guide for the software developer in the middle of catastrophic website failure. Site Reliability Engineering (SRE) has emerged on the frontline as businesses strive to maximize uptime. This book is a step-by-step framework to follow when your website is down and the countdown is on to fix it. Nat Welch has battle-hardened experience in reliability engineering at some of the biggest outage-sensitive companies on the internet. Arm yourself with his tried-and-tested methods for monitoring modern web services, setting up alerts, and evaluating your incident response. Real-World SRE goes beyond just reacting to disaster—uncover the tools and strategies needed to safely test and release software, plan for long-term growth, and foresee future bottlenecks. Real-World SRE gives you the capability to set up your own robust plan of action to see you through a company-wide website crisis. The final chapter of Real-World SRE is dedicated to acing SRE interviews, either in getting a first job or a valued promotion.
Table of Contents (13 chapters)
12
Index

Why plan?

One of my favorite things to read is a good tell-all article about how one decision caused a series of cascading failures. Seeing humanity respond to a crisis brings me great joy and, because of this, I have often been described as a proponent of chaos. What is more chaotic than the reactions of people (and systems) to failures? When I tell people that I enjoy planning and organizing, I usually get at least one raised eyebrow in response. I believe deeply in the Scout motto of be prepared and capacity planning is just that: being prepared for eventual change. The theory behind the Scout motto is finding the balance between having all of the tools necessary to deal with problems and the mental fortitude to improvise to deal with the fact that you did not bring all of the tools you need. You can never be fully prepared for risks that you do not know about. So, instead, you should build a plan that has rough edges, that has room for improvisation, and that also solves the issues...