Book Image

Learning ServiceNow. - Second Edition

5 (1)
Book Image

Learning ServiceNow. - Second Edition

5 (1)

Overview of this book

This book is an updated version of Learning ServiceNow, that will cover the new and updated features of the ServiceNow platform. It will show you how to put important ServiceNow features to work in the real world, while introducing key concepts via examples of managing and automating IT services. It'll help you build a solid foundation of knowledge, and will demonstrate how to effectively implement and configure modules within ServiceNow. We'll show you how to configure and administer your instance, and then move on to building strong user interfaces and creating powerful workflows. We also cover other key elements of ServiceNow, such as notifications, security, reporting, and custom development. You will learn how to improve and automate your business' workflow and processes. By the end of this book, you will be able to successfully configure and manage ServiceNow like a pro.
Table of Contents (19 chapters)
Learning ServiceNow Second Edition
Contributors
Preface
Index

Chapter 11. Server-Side Scripting

Server-side scripting in ServiceNow might seem easier than client-side scripting, because you don't have to worry about AJAX, asynchronicity, or large performance impacts for seemingly optimized queries. However, due to the expanded and slightly modified functionality of server-side JavaScript, there are a few additional pitfalls to be mindful of!

Scripts that run on the server, and the server-side APIs, provide a great deal of power and control to the developer that's equipped to use them properly; however, they can also put great strain on the server if used improperly. Infinite loops and poorly optimized queries in server-side scripts can be far more difficult to troubleshoot and resolve than client-side issues. They can also have much more far-reaching impact.

A client-side script error might just make a form a bit more difficult to use, but a server-side error might slow down the whole system or make large segments of functionality unavailable. It's best...