Book Image

Learning ServiceNow. - Second Edition

5 (1)
Book Image

Learning ServiceNow. - Second Edition

5 (1)

Overview of this book

This book is an updated version of Learning ServiceNow, that will cover the new and updated features of the ServiceNow platform. It will show you how to put important ServiceNow features to work in the real world, while introducing key concepts via examples of managing and automating IT services. It'll help you build a solid foundation of knowledge, and will demonstrate how to effectively implement and configure modules within ServiceNow. We'll show you how to configure and administer your instance, and then move on to building strong user interfaces and creating powerful workflows. We also cover other key elements of ServiceNow, such as notifications, security, reporting, and custom development. You will learn how to improve and automate your business' workflow and processes. By the end of this book, you will be able to successfully configure and manage ServiceNow like a pro.
Table of Contents (19 chapters)
Learning ServiceNow Second Edition
Contributors
Preface
Index

Enforcing one-to-one relationships


On the topic of few things being impossible in ServiceNow, let's discuss one-to-one relationships.

Strictly speaking, a one-to-one relationship doesn't truly exist in ServiceNow. In database parlance, this would require that the right-hand table records have a primary key which matches the primary key of a record in the left table. Thus, you could have a left-hand record without a right-hand one, but could never have a right-hand record without the left-hand one.

That's interesting, but ServiceNow's Sys IDs are unique, and they have to be, because of the way ServiceNow's databases are structured on the back-end. Technically, ServiceNow has a flat database structure, depending on how it's configured. In a sense, all records in the database (or all records in all tables that extend the Task table, at least) are in one monster-sized table. This means that the primary key (Sys ID) for a given record really must be globally unique.

Okay, so we can't have one-to...