Book Image

Mastering Windows Group Policy

By : Jordan Krause
Book Image

Mastering Windows Group Policy

By: Jordan Krause

Overview of this book

This book begins with a discussion of the core material any administrator needs to know in order to start working with Group Policy. Moving on, we will also walk through the process of building a lab environment to start testing Group Policy today. Next we will explore the Group Policy Management Console (GPMC) and start using the powerful features available for us within that interface. Once you are well versed with using GPMC, you will learn to perform and manage the traditional core tasks inside Group Policy. Included in the book are many examples and walk-throughs of the different filtering options available for the application of Group Policy settings, as this is the real power that Group Policy holds within your network. You will also learn how you can use Group Policy to secure your Active Directory environment, and also understand how Group Policy preferences are different than policies, with the help of real-world examples. Finally we will spend some time on maintenance and troubleshooting common Group Policy-related issues so that you, as a directory administrator, will understand the diagnosing process for policy settings. By the end of the book, you will be able to jump right in and use Group Policy to its full potential.
Table of Contents (12 chapters)

Checking the replication status via GPMC

When discussing GPO version numbers, we mentioned Active Directory replication a couple of times. While checking up on the status and health of the replication process itself is generally a topic outside the scope of Group Policy, AD and GP are so intertwined that it's good to know how to check the status of the replication process.

There is some functionality built right into the GPMC for checking on the overall health of the AD replication process. After opening up GPMC, click on the name of your domain, and then look at the Status tab:

There is not a lot of information listed here by default. You can see the name of my DC1 domain controller listed, indicating that I am currently communicating with DC1 in order to pull information. The real results come when you click on that Detect Now button. This will query your Domain Controllers...