Book Image

Mastering Kubernetes - Fourth Edition

By : Gigi Sayfan
3.3 (3)
Book Image

Mastering Kubernetes - Fourth Edition

3.3 (3)
By: Gigi Sayfan

Overview of this book

The fourth edition of the bestseller Mastering Kubernetes includes the most recent tools and code to enable you to learn the latest features of Kubernetes 1.25. This book contains a thorough exploration of complex concepts and best practices to help you master the skills of designing and deploying large-scale distributed systems on Kubernetes clusters. You’ll learn how to run complex stateless and stateful microservices on Kubernetes, including advanced features such as horizontal pod autoscaling, rolling updates, resource quotas, and persistent storage backends. In addition, you’ll understand how to utilize serverless computing and service meshes. Further, two new chapters have been added. “Governing Kubernetes” covers the problem of policy management, how admission control addresses it, and how policy engines provide a powerful governance solution. “Running Kubernetes in Production” shows you what it takes to run Kubernetes at scale across multiple cloud providers, multiple geographical regions, and multiple clusters, and it also explains how to handle topics such as upgrades, capacity planning, dealing with cloud provider limits/quotas, and cost management. By the end of this Kubernetes book, you’ll have a strong understanding of, and hands-on experience with, a wide range of Kubernetes capabilities.
Table of Contents (21 chapters)
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Index

Live cluster updates

One of the most complicated and risky tasks involved in running a Kubernetes cluster is a live upgrade. The interactions between different parts of the system when some parts have different versions are often difficult to predict, but in many situations, they are required. Large clusters with many users can’t afford to be offline for maintenance. The best way to attack complexity is to divide and conquer. Microservice architecture helps a lot here. You never upgrade your entire system. You just constantly upgrade several sets of related microservices, and if APIs have changed, then you upgrade their clients, too. A properly designed upgrade will preserve backward compatibility at least until all clients have been upgraded, and then deprecate old APIs across several releases.

In this section, we will discuss how to go about updating your cluster using various strategies, such as rolling updates, blue-green deployments, and canary deployments. We will...