Book Image

Modernizing Legacy Applications to Microsoft Azure

By : Steve Read, Larry Mead
Book Image

Modernizing Legacy Applications to Microsoft Azure

By: Steve Read, Larry Mead

Overview of this book

Organizations have varying circumstances, objectives, and prerequisites when contemplating a hyper-scale cloud solution transformation to a platform such as Azure. Modernizing Legacy Applications to Microsoft Azure uncovers potential scenarios and provides choices, methodologies, techniques, and prospective possibilities for transitioning from legacy applications to the Microsoft Azure environment. You’ll start by understanding the legacy systems and the main concerns regarding migration. Then, you’ll investigate why distributed architectures are compelling and the various components of the Azure platform needed during migration. After that, you’ll explore the approaches to modernizing legacy applications and the Rs of modernizing (i.e., rehost, refactor, rearchitect, and retire). You’ll also learn about integration approaches and potential pitfalls. By the end of this book, you’ll be well equipped to modernize your legacy workloads while being aware of pitfalls and best practices.
Table of Contents (18 chapters)
1
Part 1: Legacy Estate Options
3
Chapter 2: Strategies for Modernizing IBM and Unisys Mainframes
6
Part 2: Architecture Options
10
Part 3: Azure Deployment and Future Considerations

Looking at a sample Azure deployment for a mainframe workload

So, based on all of the technologies and services in Azure that we have outlined, what would a typical legacy workload look like? The age-old answer to this question is, of course, it depends. But some consistent patterns allow us to put together a good starting point for a prescriptive architecture. The following figure shows what a mainframe workload would look like in Azure:

Figure 6.3 – An example of a legacy workload in Azure

Figure 6.3 – An example of a legacy workload in Azure

These are often called Azure landing zones. There are a few things to point out about this architecture. First, as you can see, the production workload is made highly available within the Azure region by leveraging an application cluster that uses Redis Cache to keep the application servers in sync. This provides scalability and availability. With this type of implementation, more capacity can be added by adding an additional application server.

The database...