Book Image

Visualize This

By : Nathan Yau‚ÄØ
Book Image

Visualize This

By: Nathan Yau‚ÄØ

Overview of this book

Visualize This is a guide on how to visualize and tell stories with data, providing practical design tips complemented with step-by-step tutorials. It begins with a description of the huge growth of data and visualization in industry, news, and gov't and opportunities for those who tell stories with data. Logically it moves on to actual stories in data-statistical ones with trends and human stories. the technical part comes up quickly with how to gather, parse and format data with Python, R, Excel, Google docs, and so on, and details tools to visualize data-native graphics for the Web like ActionScript, Flash libraries, PHP, JavaScript, CSS, HTML. Every chapter provides an example as well. Patterns over time and kinds of data charts are followed by proportions, chart types and examples. Next, examples and descriptions of outliers and how to show them, different kinds of maps, how to guide your readers and explain the data "in the visualization". The book ends with a value-add appendix on graphical perception.
Table of Contents (12 chapters)

What to Look For

It’s easy to compare across a single variable. One house has more square feet than another house, or one cat weighs more than another cat. Across two variables, it is a little more difficult, but it’s still doable. The first house has more square feet, but the second house has more bathrooms. The first cat weighs more and has short hair, whereas the second cat weighs less and has long hair.

What if you have one hundred houses or one hundred cats to classify? What if you have more variables for each house, such as number of bedrooms, backyard size, and housing association fees? You end up with the number of units times the number of variables. Okay, now it is more tricky, and this is what we focus on.

Perhaps your data has a number of variables, but you want to classify or group units (for example, people or places) into categories and find the outliers or standouts. You want to look at each variable for differences, but you also want to see differences across...