Book Image

The Data Warehouse Toolkit - Third Edition

By : Ralph Kimball, Margy Ross
5 (1)
Book Image

The Data Warehouse Toolkit - Third Edition

5 (1)
By: Ralph Kimball, Margy Ross

Overview of this book

The volume of data continues to grow as warehouses are populated with increasingly atomic data and updated with greater frequency. Dimensional modeling has become the most widely accepted approach for presenting information in data warehouse and business intelligence (DW/BI) systems. The goal of this book is to provide a one-stop shop for dimensional modeling techniques. The book is authored by Ralph Kimball and Margy Ross, known worldwide as educators, consultants, and influential thought leaders in data warehousing and business intelligence. The book begins with a primer on data warehousing, business intelligence, and dimensional modeling, and you’ll explore more than 75-dimensional modeling techniques and patterns. Then you’ll understand dimension tables in-depth to get a good grip on retailing and moved towards the topics of inventory. Moving ahead, you’ll learn how to use this book for procurement, order management, accounting, customer relationship management, and many more business sectors. By the end of this book, you’ll be able to gather all the essential knowledge, practices, and patterns for designing dimensional models.
Table of Contents (31 chapters)
Free Chapter
1
Cover
2
Title Page
3
Copyright
4
About the Authors
5
Credits
6
Acknowledgements
29
Index
30
Advertisement
31
End User License Agreement

Alternative DW/BI Architectures

Having just described the Kimball architecture, let’s discuss several other DW/BI architectural approaches. We’ll quickly review the two dominant alternatives to the Kimball architecture, highlighting the similarities and differences. We’ll then close this section by focusing on a hybrid approach that combines alternatives.

Fortunately, over the past few decades, the differences between the Kimball architecture and the alternatives have softened. Even more fortunate, there’s a role for dimensional modeling regardless of your architectural predisposition.

We acknowledge that organizations have successfully constructed DW/BI systems based on the approaches advocated by others. We strongly believe that rather than encouraging more consternation over our philosophical differences, the industry would be far better off devoting energy to ensure that our DW/BI deliverables are broadly accepted by the business to make better, more informed...