Book Image

Data Smart

By : John W. Foreman
Book Image

Data Smart

By: John W. Foreman

Overview of this book

Data Science gets thrown around in the press like it's magic. Major retailers are predicting everything from when their customers are pregnant to when they want a new pair of Chuck Taylors. It's a brave new world where seemingly meaningless data can be transformed into valuable insight to drive smart business decisions. But how does one exactly do data science? Do you have to hire one of these priests of the dark arts, the "data scientist," to extract this gold from your data? Nope. Data science is little more than using straight-forward steps to process raw data into actionable insight. And in Data Smart, author and data scientist John Foreman will show you how that's done within the familiar environment of a spreadsheet. Why a spreadsheet? It's comfortable! You get to look at the data every step of the way, building confidence as you learn the tricks of the trade. Plus, spreadsheets are a vendor-neutral place to learn data science without the hype. But don't let the Excel sheets fool you. This is a book for those serious about learning the analytic techniques, math and the magic, behind big data.
Table of Contents (18 chapters)
Free Chapter
1
Cover
2
Credits
3
About the Author
4
About the Technical Editors
5
Acknowledgments
18
End User License Agreement

Terrible at Nothing, Bad at Everything

For this next section, imagine that you manage a large customer support call center. Each call, e-mail, or chat from a customer creates a ticket, and each member of the support team is required to handle at least 140 tickets daily. At the end of each interaction, a customer is given the opportunity to rate the support employee on a five-star scale. Support staff are required to keep an average rating above 2, or they are fired.

High standards, I know.

The company keeps track of plenty of other metrics on each employee as well. How many times they've been tardy over the past year. How many graveyard and weekend shifts they've taken for the team. How many sick days they've taken, and out of those, how many have been on Friday. The company even tracks how many hours the employee uses to take internal training courses (they get up to 40 hours paid) and how many times they've put in a request for a shift swap or been a good Samaritan...