Book Image

Level Up! The Guide to Great Video Game Design - Second Edition

By : Scott Rogers
Book Image

Level Up! The Guide to Great Video Game Design - Second Edition

By: Scott Rogers

Overview of this book

If you want to design and build cutting-edge video games but aren’t sure where to start, then the SECOND EDITION of the acclaimed Level Up! is for you! Written by leading video game expert Scott Rogers, who has designed the hits Pac Man World, Maximo and SpongeBob Squarepants, this updated edition provides clear and well-thought out examples that forgo theoretical gobbledygook with charmingly illustrated concepts and solutions based on years of professional experience. Level Up! 2nd Edition has been NEWLY EXPANDED to teach you how to develop marketable ideas, learn what perils and pitfalls await during a game’s pre-production, production and post-production stages, and provide even more creative ideas to serve as fuel for your own projects. Level Up! 2nd Edition includes all-new content, an introduction by David “God of War” Jaffe and even a brand-new chili recipe –making it an even more indispensable guide for video game designers both “in the field” and the classroom.
Table of Contents (54 chapters)
Free Chapter
1
Copyright Information
2
Publisher’s Acknowledgements
3
Foreword
6
Level 1’s Universal Truths and Clever Ideas
8
Level 2’s Universal Truths and Clever Ideas
10
Level 3’s Universal Truths and Clever Ideas
11
You Can Design a Game, but Can You Do the Paperwork?
13
Level 4’s Universal Truths and Clever Ideas
15
Level 5’s Universal Truths and Clever Ideas
17
Level 6’s Universal Truths and Clever Ideas
19
Level 7’s Universal Truths and Clever Ideas
21
Level 8’s Universal Truths and Clever Ideas
24
Level 9’s Universal Truths and Clever Ideas
26
Level 10’s Universal Truths and Clever Ideas
28
Level 11’s Universal Truths and Clever Ideas
30
Level 12’s Universal Truths and Clever Ideas
32
Level 13’s Universal Truths and Clever Ideas
34
Level 14’s Universal Truths and Clever Ideas
36
Level 15’s Universal Truths and Clever Ideas
38
Level 16’s Universal Truths and Clever Ideas
40
Level 17’s Universal Truths and Clever Ideas
42
Level 18’s Universal Truths and Clever Ideas
43
Continue?
44
The One-Sheet Sample
47
The Medium-Sized List of Story Genres
48
Game Genres
49
The Big List of Environments1
50
Mechanics and Hazards
51
Enemy Design Template
52
Boss Design Template

Who’s the Boss?

Boss design is just like enemy design: form should follow function. Knowing the boss’s movement and attacks will determine the boss’s appearance: if he can shoot, give your boss a gun (or a magic spell or a rocket launcher or a large nose to sneeze out nose goblins); and if he can defend himself, give him a shield (or a force field or protective cowling or a missile-deflecting karate move). In a nutshell, if the boss can use it, he should have it.

Next, consider how the boss relates to the hero. No, I don’t mean in a “Darth Vader is your father” way, but rather what the boss represents. The James Bond movies of the 1960s and 1970s had a really good formula for bad guys. There were technically three “boss types” that Bond had to defeat.

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The first villain was the arch henchman: the physical adversary. A muscle-bound goon would beat the tar out of Bond until he turned the tables with one of his spy gadgets or a deftly...