Book Image

Unity Game Optimization - Third Edition

By : Dr. Davide Aversa, Chris Dickinson
Book Image

Unity Game Optimization - Third Edition

By: Dr. Davide Aversa, Chris Dickinson

Overview of this book

Unity engine comes with a great set of features to help you build high-performance games. This Unity book is your guide to optimizing various aspects of your game development, from game characters and scripts, right through to animations. You’ll explore techniques for writing better game scripts and learn how to optimize a game using Unity technologies such as ECS and the Burst compiler. The book will also help you manage third-party tooling used with the Unity ecosystem. You’ll also focus on the problems in the performance of large games and virtual reality (VR) projects in Unity, gaining insights into detecting performance issues and performing root cause analysis. As you progress, you’ll discover best practices for your Unity C# script code and get to grips with usage patterns. Later, you’ll be able to optimize audio resources and texture files, along with effectively storing and using resource files. You’ll then delve into the Rendering Pipeline and learn how to identify performance problems in the pipeline. In addition to this, you’ll learn how to optimize the memory and processing unit of Unity. Finally, you’ll cover tips and tricks used by Unity professionals to improve the project workflow. By the end of this book, you’ll have developed the skills you need to build interactive games using Unity and its components.
Table of Contents (15 chapters)
Free Chapter
1
Section 1: Base Scripting Optimization
4
Section 2: Graphical Optimizations
9
Section 3: Advance Optimizations

To get the most out of this book

The majority of this book will focus on features and enhancements that apply to Unity 2019 and Unity 2020. Many of the techniques explored within this book can be applied to Unity 2018 projects and older, but some features may be different. These differences will be highlighted, where applicable.

It is worth noting that the code it is supposed to work on Unity 2020 but at the time of writing we could only test it on the alpha version. Additional incompatibilities may arise when Unity 2020 comes out of alpha.

Download the example code files

You can download the example code files for this book from your account at www.packt.com. If you purchased this book elsewhere, you can visit www.packtpub.com/support and register to have the files emailed directly to you.

You can download the code files by following these steps:

  1. Log in or register at www.packt.com.
  2. Select the Support tab.
  3. Click on Code Downloads.
  4. Enter the name of the book in the Search box and follow the onscreen instructions.

Once the file is downloaded, please make sure that you unzip or extract the folder using the latest version of:

  • WinRAR/7-Zip for Windows
  • Zipeg/iZip/UnRarX for Mac
  • 7-Zip/PeaZip for Linux

The code bundle for the book is also hosted on GitHub at https://github.com/PacktPublishing/Unity-Game-Optimization-Third-Edition. In case there's an update to the code, it will be updated on the existing GitHub repository.

We also have other code bundles from our rich catalog of books and videos available at https://github.com/PacktPublishing/. Check them out!

Download the color images

Conventions used

There are a number of text conventions used throughout this book.

CodeInText: Indicates code words in text, database table names, folder names, filenames, file extensions, pathnames, dummy URLs, user input, and Twitter handles. Here is an example: "These can be accessed through the UnityEngine.Profiling.Profiler class through its BeginSample() and EndSample() methods."

A block of code is set as follows:

void DoSomethingCompletelyStupid() { 
Profiler.BeginSample("My Profiler Sample");
List<int> listOfInts = new List<int>();
for(int i = 0; i < 1000000; ++i) {
listOfInts.Add(i);
}
Profiler.EndSample();
}

Bold: Indicates a new term, an important word, or words that you see on screen. For example, words in menus or dialog boxes appear in the text like this. Here is an example: "When a Unity application is compiled in Development Mode."

Warnings or important notes appear like this.
Tips and tricks appear like this.