Book Image

Instant Optimizing Embedded Systems Using BusyBox

By : Wu Zhangjin, Cao Ziqiang
Book Image

Instant Optimizing Embedded Systems Using BusyBox

By: Wu Zhangjin, Cao Ziqiang

Overview of this book

As hundreds of millions of people have started using Android smartphones, embedded Linux systems are becoming more and more popular. To get more market share, not only for hardware and function piling up, smartphone manufacturers gradually realized the importance of user experience. To improve user experience, the back-end Linux system must be optimized in many ways. Instant Optimizing Embedded System Using BusyBox is a practical, hands-on guide that provides you with a number of clear, step-by-step exercises to help you take advantage of the real power behind Busybox, and give you a good grounding for using it to optimize your embedded (Android Linux) systems. Moving on from the basics, this book will teach you how to configure and compile it from source code, including cross-compiling it with static linking and dynamic linking. You will also learn how to install and use Busybox on the Android emulator. You will learn to replace the simple Android mksh console with Busybox ash console and start a telnet and HTTP service provided by Busybox. You will also build embedded Linux file system from scratch and start it on Android emulator. We will take a look at how to add functionality to Busybox based system, including adding external applets to Busybox, as well as building development environments (like Bash and C) for it manually or with the automatic Buildroot system. If want to learn how to take advantage of using Busybox applets to optimize your embedded system, then this is the book for you for it will also show you how to use the powerful applets to optimize multiple aspects of an embedded (Android Linux) system.This book will teach you how to build an embedded (Android Linux) system with Busybox, enhance its functionality to meet diverse system requirements, and optimize it to provide a better user experience for embedded products.
Table of Contents (8 chapters)

About the Reviewers

Kevin Boone has been developing software since the days 16 KB was a RAM upgrade. By the time a MB was starting to feel cramped, he'd worked on projects ranging in scale from heart pacemakers to oil platforms, and was teaching Software Engineering to other people. He earned his PhD at around the time an MB was an only modest memory size for a PDA. These days, Kevin spends most of his time working on server applications that struggle to fit into a GB; nevertheless, he maintains and contributes to a number of open source projects associated with embedded Linux and Android. On those rare occasions when he isn't slumped in front of a computer screen, Kevin enjoys playing the piano, outdoor sports, and being a dad.

Gergely Gati began programming in the mid-eighties on a Commodore 16. One of his first publicly available work was the CP4, a C=+4 emulator for Amiga, written in 90 percent assembly. Over the last ten years, he has gained experience in the embedded communication domain, especially in safety critical vehicle network systems. AUTOSAR is a CAR-OEM-supported open standard, which intended to be an answer to the increasing complexity of in-car networks. Gati played the main role in creating one of the first experimental AUTOSAR 2.1 applications. In his spare time, he works on mobile apps for Java and Android phones. His most popular app is Weather—weather.midlets.eu—which runs on basic Nokia phones to advanced smartphones.

Jason Winnebeck is a software developer with over 10 years of experience in Java technologies and embedded development and deployment on Linux-based platforms in military and commercial environments, as well as databases and RESTful web services. He holds a Master's degree in Computer Science from the Rochester Institute of Technology.