Book Image

Raspberry Pi for Secret Agents - Third Edition

Book Image

Raspberry Pi for Secret Agents - Third Edition

Overview of this book

This book is for all mischievous Raspberry Pi owners who’d like to see their computer transform into a neat spy gadget to be used in a series of practical pranks and projects. No previous skills are required to follow along, and if you’re completely new to Linux, you’ll pick up much of the basics for free. We’ll help you set up your Raspberry Pi Zero, Raspberry Pi 2 and Raspberry Pi 3 and guide you through a number of pranks and secret agent techniques that are so inconspicuous yet high on mischief. You’ll learn how to configure your operating system for maximum mischief and start exploring audio, video, or Wi-Fi techniques. We’ll show you how to record, listen, or talk to people from a distance and how to set up your own phone network. Then, you’ll plug in your webcam and set up a motion detector with an alarm and find out what the other computers on your Wi-Fi network are up to. Once you’ve mastered the techniques, we’ll combine them with a battery pack and GPS for the ultimate off-road spy kit.
Table of Contents (7 chapters)

Raspberry Pi 3

As I write (February 2016), the Foundation has just launched their next update of the Pi—the Raspberry Pi 3—and just in time, as not only is it more powerful, with a 64-bit ARMv8 processor, it also includes Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connectivity on the board, without requiring any additional dongles to be connected to the USB ports. They are also easier to get your hands on at this time compared to the Pi Zero.

This could be a game-changer for our sneaky activities, as it means we can build more discreet secret agent tools and devices. Incidentally, the Raspberry Pi 3 is available at the same benchmark cost of less than £30 from the main distributors, RS and Farnell element14:

Raspberry Pi 3
The new Raspberry Pi 3–looks like the previous model but now with Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 4.1 on-board

As you have seen, in its short lifetime the Raspberry Pi already has several models available, each of which suits different application needs. To help us choose, the following table provides a comparison between the various models:

Model B+

Model 2

Model 3

Zero

Processor

Broadcom BCM2835 SoC featuring ARM1176 32-bit dual-core CPU

Broadcom BCM2836Soc featuring ARMv7 32-bit quad-core CPU

Broadcom BCM2837 SoC featuring ARMv8 64-bit quad-core CPU

Broadcom BCM2835 SoC featuring ARM1176 32-bit dual-core CPU

GPU

VideoCore IV

   

Clock

700MHz

900MHz

1.2GHz

1GHz

Memory

512 MB

1 GB

1 GB

512 MB

USB Ports

4

4

4

1 (Micro-USB)

Ethernet

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

Wi-Fi

No

No

Yes

No

Bluetooth

No

No

Yes

No

GPIO Pins

40

40

40

40 (unpop.)

Storage

MicroSD card

MicroSD card

MicroSD card

MicroSD card

So, which Pi for us spies?

In this latest edition of this book, we're going to focus on the current Raspberry Pi version 2 and new version 3 models, as well as the Raspberry Pi Zero for those projects that might require a computer board that's somewhat more discreet. Each of these versions has different features and advantages, so we'll chose the right version for the job for each of our secret agent tools.

The Raspberry Pi Foundation site has more detailed information about each model here: https://www.raspberrypi.org/products/.

Where to buy a Pi

The main distributors for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3 are RS Components and Farnell element14, but you may need a trade account to buy from them. Alternatively, there are other vendors on the Internet that sell them, including CPC and Maplin Electronics, as well as a plethora of independent sellers on Amazon and eBay.

The Raspberry Pi Zero is currently manufactured by the Raspberry Pi Foundation and is distributed through their official partners: