Book Image

Arduino Data Communications

By : Robert Thas John
5 (1)
Book Image

Arduino Data Communications

5 (1)
By: Robert Thas John

Overview of this book

In our modern, internet-connected world, where billions of devices constantly collect and send data to systems to be stored and processed, it’s surprising how the intricacies of data transmission and storage are often overlooked in the IoT domain. With Arduino Data Communications, you'll bridge the knowledge gap and become an expert in collecting data from IoT sensors, transmitting data, and configuring your own databases. This book is an exploration of IoT’s inner workings, guiding you through the process of setting up an end-to-end system that you can employ to prototype your own IoT solutions, using easy-to-follow examples. It begins with a general overview of the Arduino ecosystem, acquainting you with various sensors and shields and unveiling the art of data collection. You’ll then explore data formats and methods to store data, both locally and on database servers. As you progress through the chapters, you’ll learn how to set up REST and MQTT infrastructure to communicate with databases and get hands-on with LoRaWAN, Ethernet, cellular, HC-12, and RS-485. The final chapters are your training ground for real-world projects, imparting the essential knowledge you need to tackle complex challenges with confidence. By the end of this Arduino book, you'll have seamlessly configured an end-to-end system, all while immersing yourself in practical scenarios that bring the world of IoT to life.
Table of Contents (20 chapters)
1
Part 1:Introduction to Arduino and Sensor Data
7
Part 2:Sending Data
14
Part 3: Miscellaneous Topics

Preface

I spent nearly two decades of my life writing software, training and deploying machine learning models, and speaking and teaching about these topics. I got introduced to Stephen Ozoigbo at ARM, who asked whether I had any experience speaking about ML on microcontrollers. I didn’t, but I was willing to look into that. That was the beginning of my journey into TinyML. He sent me some kits from SparkFun Electronics, which I used for a 20-person workshop in 2021. I spent the next 12 months talking to developer communities in Sub-Saharan Africa about ML on the Arduino Nano RP2040 Connect. I also organized something I called the Embedded Learning Challenge, with microcontrollers paid for by ARM. All this exposed a knowledge gap on the continent when it comes to a basic understanding of microcontrollers. This book is meant to serve as an introduction to programming Arduinos. The choice of the Arduino MKR is because of the existence of certain shields that are good for learning how to work with these components without learning how to solder. My hope for you is that you will use this as a stepping stone toward solving real-world problems.