Book Image

Handbook of Usability Testing - Second Edition

By : Jeffrey Rubin, Dana Chisnell
Book Image

Handbook of Usability Testing - Second Edition

By: Jeffrey Rubin, Dana Chisnell

Overview of this book

Whether it's software, technical documentation, a cell phone, or a refrigerator, your customer expects your product to be easy to use. Completely updated with current industry best practices and more varied examples, it can give you that all-important marketplace advantage: products that perform the way users expect. The first part of the book introduces you to the overview of testing which covers the definition of the key terms and presents an expanded discussion of user-centered design and other usability techniques. As you progress, you’ll learn the various steps involved in performing a test. The later chapters explore the advanced testing methods and discuss how to extend one’s influence of the whole product development strategy. By the end of this book, you’ll have the exact knowledge to understand and improve the usability of your product.
Table of Contents (6 chapters)

Chapter 10

Debrief the Participant and Observers

Debriefing refers to exploring and reviewing the participant's actions during the performance portion of a usability test. When first sitting down to organize this book, Jeff was not sure whether to assign debriefing to its own stage of testing or to combine it with the previous stage of conducting the test. After all, one could argue that debriefing is really an extension of the testing process. Participants perform some tasks, and you interview them either in phases or after the entire test.

Because there is much to learn during the debriefing portions of tests, it seemed apparent that debriefing warranted its own separate treatment, or stage of testing. While the performance of the usability test uncovers and exposes problems, it is often the debriefing session that sheds light on why these problems occurred and how to fix them. Though a debriefing does not have to be formal or extensive, it is often not until the debriefing session...