Book Image

Rust Standard Library Cookbook

By : Jan Hohenheim, Daniel Durante
Book Image

Rust Standard Library Cookbook

By: Jan Hohenheim, Daniel Durante

Overview of this book

Mozilla’s Rust is gaining much attention with amazing features and a powerful library. This book will take you through varied recipes to teach you how to leverage the Standard library to implement efficient solutions. The book begins with a brief look at the basic modules of the Standard library and collections. From here, the recipes will cover packages that support file/directory handling and interaction through parsing. You will learn about packages related to advanced data structures, error handling, and networking. You will also learn to work with futures and experimental nightly features. The book also covers the most relevant external crates in Rust. By the end of the book, you will be proficient at using the Rust Standard library.
Table of Contents (12 chapters)

How it works...

A Generator is currently defined as any closure that uses the new yield keyword. When it is executed with .resume() [11], it will run until it hits a yield. If run again, the generator will continue where it left off until it reaches another yield or encounters a return. If there are no more yields left in the generator, it will simply return an empty tuple, behaving as if encountering return ();.

Because there are two scenarios of what a generator does (yield vs return), you have to check the result of .resume() every time you use it, as it could be GeneratorState::Yielded or GeneratorState::Complete.

At the time of writing, you can return a different type than you yield. The situation around this is somewhat unclear, as the reason for this quirk is the aforementioned convention to return (); when running out of yields. Maybe the final version of generators in Rust will not rely on this behavior, and only allow returning the same type as yielding. You can find the discussion...