Book Image

Rust Standard Library Cookbook

By : Jan Hohenheim, Daniel Durante
Book Image

Rust Standard Library Cookbook

By: Jan Hohenheim, Daniel Durante

Overview of this book

Mozilla’s Rust is gaining much attention with amazing features and a powerful library. This book will take you through varied recipes to teach you how to leverage the Standard library to implement efficient solutions. The book begins with a brief look at the basic modules of the Standard library and collections. From here, the recipes will cover packages that support file/directory handling and interaction through parsing. You will learn about packages related to advanced data structures, error handling, and networking. You will also learn to work with futures and experimental nightly features. The book also covers the most relevant external crates in Rust. By the end of the book, you will be proficient at using the Rust Standard library.
Table of Contents (12 chapters)

There's more...

This example is tailored to be in line with the implementations of RwLock and Mutex. The only thing missing is an extra layer of indirection that has been omitted to not make this recipe even more complex. SomeOsSpecificFunctionalityHandle shouldn't contain actual implementations of lock and unlock, but instead, pass the calls onto a stored implementation that is specific to whatever OS you're using. For example, say you have a struct, windows::SomeOsSpecificFunctionalityHandle, for a Windows-based implementation and a struct, unix::SomeOsSpecificFunctionalityHandle, for a Unix-based implementation. SomeOsSpecificFunctionalityHandle should then, conditionally, depending on the operating system that is being run, pass its lock and unlock calls onto the correct implementations. These may have many more features. The Windows one could maybe have a awesome_windows_thing() function that might be useful to the unlucky Windows developer that needs it...