Book Image

Functional Python Programming. - Second Edition

Book Image

Functional Python Programming. - Second Edition

Overview of this book

If you’re a Python developer who wants to discover how to take the power of functional programming (FP) and bring it into your own programs, then this book is essential for you, even if you know next to nothing about the paradigm. Starting with a general overview of functional concepts, you’ll explore common functional features such as first-class and higher-order functions, pure functions, and more. You’ll see how these are accomplished in Python 3.6 to give you the core foundations you’ll build upon. After that, you’ll discover common functional optimizations for Python to help your apps reach even higher speeds. You’ll learn FP concepts such as lazy evaluation using Python’s generator functions and expressions. Moving forward, you’ll learn to design and implement decorators to create composite functions. You'll also explore data preparation techniques and data exploration in depth, and see how the Python standard library fits the functional programming model. Finally, to top off your journey into the world of functional Python, you’ll at look at the PyMonad project and some larger examples to put everything into perspective.
Table of Contents (22 chapters)
Title Page
Packt Upsell
Contributors
Preface
Index

Functional type systems


Some functional programming languages, such as Haskell and Scala, are statically compiled, and depend on declared types for functions and their arguments. To provide the kind of flexibility Python already has, these languages have sophisticated type-matching rules so that a generic function can be written, which works for a variety of related types.

In Object-Oriented Python, we often use the class inheritance hierarchy instead of sophisticated function type matching. We rely on Python to dispatch an operator to a proper method based on simple name-matching rules.

Since Python already has the desired levels of flexibility, the type matching rules for a compiled functional language aren't relevant. Indeed, we could argue that the sophisticated type matching is a workaround imposed by static compilation. Python doesn't need this workaround because it's a dynamic language.

Python 3 introduces type hints. These can be used by a program like mypy to discern potential problems...