Book Image

Hands-On Domain-Driven Design with .NET Core

By : Alexey Zimarev
5 (1)
Book Image

Hands-On Domain-Driven Design with .NET Core

5 (1)
By: Alexey Zimarev

Overview of this book

Developers across the world are rapidly adopting DDD principles to deliver powerful results when writing software that deals with complex business requirements. This book will guide you in involving business stakeholders when choosing the software you are planning to build for them. By figuring out the temporal nature of behavior-driven domain models, you will be able to build leaner, more agile, and modular systems. You’ll begin by uncovering domain complexity and learn how to capture the behavioral aspects of the domain language. You will then learn about EventStorming and advance to creating a new project in .NET Core 2.1; you’ll also and write some code to transfer your events from sticky notes to C#. The book will show you how to use aggregates to handle commands and produce events. As you progress, you’ll get to grips with Bounded Contexts, Context Map, Event Sourcing, and CQRS. After translating domain models into executable C# code, you will create a frontend for your application using Vue.js. In addition to this, you’ll learn how to refactor your code and cover event versioning and migration essentials. By the end of this DDD book, you will have gained the confidence to implement the DDD approach in your organization and be able to explore new techniques that complement what you’ve learned from the book.
Table of Contents (14 chapters)

To get the most out of this book

In order to follow the instructions in this book, you need to have intermediate-level understanding of C#. Other requirements are mentioned at the relevant instances in the respective chapters.

Diagrams for this book are created using Miro, an online collaboration tool, and draw.io, the free online service for creating diagrams and wireframes. The line style and the font are used intentionally, to embrace the temporal nature and usefulness of all models and diagrams

Download the example code files

You can download the example code files for this book from your account at www.packtpub.com. If you purchased this book elsewhere, you can visit www.packtpub.com/support and register to have the files emailed directly to you.

You can download the code files by following these steps:

  1. Log in or register at www.packtpub.com.
  2. Select the SUPPORT tab.
  3. Click on Code Downloads & Errata.
  4. Enter the name of the book in the Search box and follow the onscreen instructions.

Once the file is downloaded, please make sure that you unzip or extract the folder using the latest version of:

  • WinRAR/7-Zip for Windows
  • Zipeg/iZip/UnRarX for Mac
  • 7-Zip/PeaZip for Linux

The code bundle for the book is also hosted on GitHub at https://github.com/PacktPublishing/Hands-On-Domain-Driven-Design-with-.NET-Core. In case there's an update to the code, it will be updated on the existing GitHub repository.

We also have other code bundles from our rich catalog of books and videos available at https://github.com/PacktPublishing/. Check them out!

Download the color images

We also provide a PDF file that has color images of the screenshots/diagrams used in this book. You can download it here: https://www.packtpub.com/sites/default/files/downloads/9781788834094_ColorImages.pdf

Conventions used

There are a number of text conventions used throughout this book.

CodeInText: Indicates code words in text, database table names, folder names, filenames, file extensions, pathnames, dummy URLs, user input, and Twitter handles. Here is an example: "Mount the downloaded WebStorm-10*.dmg disk image file as another disk in your system."

A block of code is set as follows:

html, body, #map {
height: 100%;
margin: 0;
padding: 0
}

When we wish to draw your attention to a particular part of a code block, the relevant lines or items are set in bold:

[default]
exten => s,1,Dial(Zap/1|30)
exten => s,2,Voicemail(u100)
exten => s,102,Voicemail(b100)
exten => i,1,Voicemail(s0)

Any command-line input or output is written as follows:

$ mkdir css
$ cd css

Bold: Indicates a new term, an important word, or words that you see onscreen. For example, words in menus or dialog boxes appear in the text like this. Here is an example: "Select System info from the Administration panel."

Warnings or important notes appear like this.
Tips and tricks appear like this.