Book Image

Learn Red ? Fundamentals of Red

By : Ivo Balbaert
Book Image

Learn Red ? Fundamentals of Red

By: Ivo Balbaert

Overview of this book

A key problem of software development today is software bloat, where huge toolchains and development environments are needed in software coding and deployment. Red significantly reduces this bloat by offering a minimalist but complete toolchain. This is the first introductory book about it, and it will get you up and running with Red as quickly as possible. This book shows you how to write effective functions, reduce code redundancies, and improve code reuse. It will be helpful for new programmers who are starting out with Red to explore its wide and ever-growing package ecosystem and also for experienced developers who want to add Red to their skill set. The book presents the fundamentals of programming in Red and in-depth informative examples using a step-by-step approach. You will be taken through concepts and examples such as doing simple metaprogramming, functions, collections, GUI applications, and more. By the end of the book, you will be fully equipped to start your own projects in Red.
Table of Contents (13 chapters)
11
Assessments

Series and blocks

Let's look at an example. The letters A B C D are contained within the block [A B C D]. Coming from other programming languages, you may be more used to terms such as lists or arrays. These are very much the same as series. In Red, multidimensional arrays can be represented by nested blocks. If you want a more formal definition, we could say that a series is an ordered set of items, which can be values (data) or words (code). In the preceding example, the items are words such as A B and so on (they are not strings or characters), and they must get a value at some time while running the program. In Red, you can manipulate code as easily as you can manipulate data.

=> Now answer question 1 from the Questions section.

Because a series is ordered, each item in it can be referred to by a number—its index. The index in Red starts counting from 1, so...