Book Image

The Art of CRM

By : Max Fatouretchi
Book Image

The Art of CRM

By: Max Fatouretchi

Overview of this book

CRM systems have delivered huge value to organizations. This book shares proven and cutting-edge techniques to increase the power of CRM even further. In The Art of CRM, Max Fatouretchi shares his decades of experience building successful CRM systems that make a real difference to business performance. Through clear processes, actionable advice, and informative case studies, The Art of CRM teaches you to design successful CRM systems for your clients. Fatouretchi, founder of Academy4CRM institute, draws on his experience over 20 years and 200 CRM implementations worldwide. Bringing CRM bang up to date, The Art of CRM shows how to add AI and machine learning, ensure compliance with GDPR, and choose between on-premise, cloud, and hybrid hosting solutions. If you’re looking for an expert guide to real-world CRM implementations, this book is for you.
Table of Contents (15 chapters)
The Art of CRM
Contributors
Preface
Introduction
Other Books You May Enjoy
Index

Case study — VeriPark


Before we go any further, I would like to take a real-life example from one of my partners I have been working with. The company is called VeriPark and it is a very successful CRM company that is operating across all the continents of the world. With its permission, we're going to explore its base (out-of-the-box) solution for a 360-degree client view and see how it has built a sophisticated role-based solution. We're going to share its experience, along with some of the best practices it committed to, and let you extract some of the knowledge that you'll be able to apply to your own journey.

After conducting business workshops with stakeholders and business analysts, VeriPark typically configures and integrates the base module for role-based solutions to each individual company's requirements and pain points. As we've highlighted in this chapter already, building a role-based, comprehensive, 360-degree client view is not, as it might look as a first impression, a walk...