Book Image

The Art of CRM

By : Max Fatouretchi
Book Image

The Art of CRM

By: Max Fatouretchi

Overview of this book

CRM systems have delivered huge value to organizations. This book shares proven and cutting-edge techniques to increase the power of CRM even further. In The Art of CRM, Max Fatouretchi shares his decades of experience building successful CRM systems that make a real difference to business performance. Through clear processes, actionable advice, and informative case studies, The Art of CRM teaches you to design successful CRM systems for your clients. Fatouretchi, founder of Academy4CRM institute, draws on his experience over 20 years and 200 CRM implementations worldwide. Bringing CRM bang up to date, The Art of CRM shows how to add AI and machine learning, ensure compliance with GDPR, and choose between on-premise, cloud, and hybrid hosting solutions. If you’re looking for an expert guide to real-world CRM implementations, this book is for you.
Table of Contents (15 chapters)
The Art of CRM
Contributors
Preface
Introduction
Other Books You May Enjoy
Index

Solution Blueprint


A Solution Blueprint contains both the scope and design of the solution through a series of architecture patterns. Each architecture presents the solution and its core design assertions through a unique perspective, as we will now explore.

A blueprint is used as either an architectural plan or technical drawing. The concept was first introduced by Sir John Herschel in 1842, using a contact print process on light-sensitive sheets. It was a drawing of white lines on a blue background, thus its name. Traditional blueprints became obsolete as less expensive printing methods and computer technology became widely available.

The term has been used since then for many other purposes, including within the software industry, where it's taken on the role of the Solution Blueprint. It's best suited for CRM solutions, as well as solution architectural plans for other types of business applications where there are many stakeholders and different views are required to break down the complexity...