Book Image

C# Data Structures and Algorithms - Second Edition

By : Marcin Jamro
Book Image

C# Data Structures and Algorithms - Second Edition

By: Marcin Jamro

Overview of this book

Building your own applications is exciting but challenging, especially when tackling complex problems tied to advanced data structures and algorithms. This endeavor demands profound knowledge of the programming language as well as data structures and algorithms – precisely what this book offers to C# developers. Starting with an introduction to algorithms, this book gradually immerses you in the world of arrays, lists, stacks, queues, dictionaries, and sets. Real-world examples, enriched with code snippets and illustrations, provide a practical understanding of these concepts. You’ll also learn how to sort arrays using various algorithms, setting a solid foundation for your programming expertise. As you progress through the book, you’ll venture into more complex data structures – trees and graphs – and discover algorithms for tasks such as determining the shortest path in a graph before advancing to see various algorithms in action, such as solving Sudoku. By the end of the book, you’ll have learned how to use the C# language to build algorithmic components that are not only easy to understand and debug but also seamlessly applicable in various applications, spanning web and mobile platforms.
Table of Contents (13 chapters)

“Sorted” sets

The previously described HashSet class can be understood as a dictionary that stores only keys, without values. So, if there is the SortedDictionary class, maybe there is also the SortedSet class? There is! However, can a set be “sorted”? Why is “sorted” written with quotation marks? The answer turns out to be very simple. By definition, a set stores a collection of distinct objects without duplicated elements and without a particular order. If a set does not support order, how can it be “sorted”? For this reason, a “sorted” set can be understood as a combination of HashSet and SortedList, not a set itself.

Imagine a “sorted” set

If you want to better imagine a “sorted” set, recall the previous example related to the game of chance. To facilitate manual comparison of results, both the set of randomly drawn numbers and the set of numbers selected by you can be “...