Book Image

How to Measure Anything in Cybersecurity Risk

By : Douglas W. Hubbard, Richard Seiersen
Book Image

How to Measure Anything in Cybersecurity Risk

By: Douglas W. Hubbard, Richard Seiersen

Overview of this book

How to Measure Anything in Cybersecurity Risk exposes the shortcomings of current “risk management” practices, and offers a series of improvement techniques that help you fill the holes and ramp up security. In his bestselling book How to Measure Anything, author Douglas W. Hubbard opened the business world’s eyes to the critical need for better measurement. This book expands upon that premise and draws from The Failure of Risk Management to sound the alarm in the cybersecurity realm. Some of the field’s premier risk management approaches actually create more risk than they mitigate, and questionable methods have been duplicated across industries and embedded in the products accepted as gospel. This book sheds light on these blatant risks and provides alternate techniques that can help improve your current situation. You’ll also learn which approaches are too risky to save and are actually more damaging than a total lack of any security. Dangerous risk management methods abound; there is no industry more critically in need of solutions than cybersecurity. This book provides solutions where they exist and advises when to change tracks entirely.
Table of Contents (12 chapters)
Free Chapter
1
Foreword
2
Foreword
3
Acknowledgments
4
About the Authors
9
Index
10
EULA

Chapter 3
Model Now!: An Introduction to Practical Quantitative Methods for Cybersecurity

Build a little. Test a little. Learn a lot.

—Rear Admiral Wayne Meyer,

Aegis Weapon System Program Manager

In this chapter we will propose a simple starting point for developing a quantitative risk assessment. Later, we will explore more detailed models (starting in Chapter 6) and more advanced methods (starting in Chapter 8). But for now we will start with a model that merely replaces the common risk matrix. It will simply be a way to capture subjective estimates of likelihood and impact, but do so probabilistically.

To make it work, we need to introduce a few methods. First, we need to introduce the idea of subjectively assessing probabilities, but we will defer the exercises to train you to do that until Chapter 7 (for now, hang in there). We will also introduce a very basic simulation method, and the work of actually building the simulation is mostly done for you. The example...