Book Image

Learning Material Design

By : Kyle Mew
Book Image

Learning Material Design

By: Kyle Mew

Overview of this book

Google's Material Design language has taken the web development and design worlds by storm. Now available on many more platforms than Android, Material Design uses color, light, and movements to not only generate beautiful interfaces, but to provide intuitive navigation for the user. Learning Material Design will teach you the fundamental theories of Material Design using code samples to put these theories into practice. Focusing primarily on Android Studio, you’ll create mobile interfaces using the most widely used and powerful material components, such as sliding drawers and floating action buttons. Each section will introduce the relevant Java classes and APIs required to implement these components. With the rules regarding structure, layout, iconography, and typography covered, we then move into animation and transition, possibly Material Design's most powerful concept, allowing complex hierarchies to be displayed simply and stylishly. With all the basic technologies and concepts mastered, the book concludes by showing you how these skills can be applied to other platforms, in particular web apps, using the powerful Polymer library.
Table of Contents (17 chapters)

Cards


CardView is probably the most frequently used and flexible material component, and as such, there are a considerable number of guidelines concerning its structure, appearance, and function. Cards are described by Google as being entry points to more detailed information. This means that they should provide a small number of actions in the form of buttons, clickable images, and often, simply the card itself.

The way we used cards in the previous section, to create a list, is probably not the best example of how to employ CardView. Generally, with lists of items with very similar content, a simple divider provides a far less cluttered layout, and cards were used here just to demonstrate RecyclerViews in an easily digestible fashion.

Cards come into their own when they can be be presented in a collection where they do not all share identical layouts. In fact, one of the things that makes cards so useful is that although they are required to have uniform widths, there is no necessity for...