Book Image

Node.js Web Development. - Fourth Edition

By : David Herron
Book Image

Node.js Web Development. - Fourth Edition

By: David Herron

Overview of this book

Node.js is a server-side JavaScript platform using an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model allowing users to build fast and scalable data-intensive applications running in real time. This book gives you an excellent starting point, bringing you straight to the heart of developing web applications with Node.js. You will progress from a rudimentary knowledge of JavaScript and server-side development to being able to create, maintain, deploy and test your own Node.js application.You will understand the importance of transitioning to functions that return Promise objects, and the difference between fs, fs/promises and fs-extra. With this book you'll learn how to use the HTTP Server and Client objects, data storage with both SQL and MongoDB databases, real-time applications with Socket.IO, mobile-first theming with Bootstrap, microservice deployment with Docker, authenticating against third-party services using OAuth, and use some well known tools to beef up security of Express 4.16 applications.
Table of Contents (19 chapters)
Title Page
Dedication
Packt Upsell
Contributors
Preface
Index

Summary


We've covered a lot of territory in this chapter, looking at three distinct areas of testing: unit testing, REST API testing, and UI functional tests. Ensuring that an application is well tested is an important step on the road to software success. A team that does not follow good testing practices is often bogged down with fixing regression after regression.

We've talked about the potential simplicity of simply using the assert module for testing. While the test frameworks, such as Mocha, provide great features, we can go a long way with a simple script.

There is a place for test frameworks, such as Mocha, if only to regularize our test cases, and to produce test results reports. We used Mocha and Chai for this, and these tools were quite successful. We even found a couple of bugs with a small test suite.

When starting down the unit testing road, one design consideration is mocking out dependencies. But it's not always a good use of our time to replace every dependency with a mock...