Book Image

Rust Web Programming - Second Edition

By : Maxwell Flitton
Book Image

Rust Web Programming - Second Edition

By: Maxwell Flitton

Overview of this book

Are safety and high performance a big concern for you while developing web applications? With this practical Rust book, you’ll discover how you can implement Rust on the web to achieve the desired performance and security as you learn techniques and tooling to build fully operational web apps. In this second edition, you’ll get hands-on with implementing emerging Rust web frameworks, including Actix, Rocket, and Hyper. It also features HTTPS configuration on AWS when deploying a web application and introduces you to Terraform for automating the building of web infrastructure on AWS. What’s more, this edition also covers advanced async topics. Built on the Tokio async runtime, this explores TCP and framing, implementing async systems with the actor framework, and queuing tasks on Redis to be consumed by a number of worker nodes. Finally, you’ll go over best practices for packaging Rust servers in distroless Rust Docker images with database drivers, so your servers are a total size of 50Mb each. By the end of this book, you’ll have confidence in your skills to build robust, functional, and scalable web applications from scratch.
Table of Contents (27 chapters)
Free Chapter
1
Part 1:Getting Started with Rust Web Development
4
Part 2:Processing Data and Managing Displays
8
Part 3:Data Persistence
12
Part 4:Testing and Deployment
16
Part 5:Making Our Projects Flexible
19
Part 6:Exploring Protocol Programming and Async Concepts with Low-Level Network Applications

Conventions used

There are a number of text conventions used throughout this book.

Code in text: Indicates code words in text, database table names, folder names, filenames, file extensions, pathnames, dummy URLs, user input, and Twitter handles. Here is an example: “This means that we must alter the existing schema for the to-do item table and add a user schema to the src/schema.rs file.”

A block of code is set as follows:

table! {
    to_do (id) {
        id -> Int4,
        title -> Varchar,
        status -> Varchar,
        date -> Timestamp,
        user_id -> Int4,
    }
}
table! {
    users (id) {
        id -> Int4,
        username -> Varchar,
        email -> Varchar,
        password -> Varchar,
        unique_id -> Varchar,
    }
}

When we wish to draw your attention to a particular part of a code block, the relevant lines or items are set in bold:

[default]
exten => s,1,Dial(Zap/1|30)
exten => s,2,Voicemail(u100)
exten => s,102,Voicemail(b100)
exten => i,1,Voicemail(s0)

Any command-line input or output is written as follows:

docker-compose up

Bold: Indicates a new term, an important word, or words that you see onscreen. For instance, words in menus or dialog boxes appear in bold. Here is an example: “If we press the Send button in Postman another two times before the initial 30 seconds is up, we get the following printout:”

Tips or important notes

Appear like this.