Book Image

Elasticsearch 8.x Cookbook - Fifth Edition

By : Alberto Paro
Book Image

Elasticsearch 8.x Cookbook - Fifth Edition

By: Alberto Paro

Overview of this book

Elasticsearch is a Lucene-based distributed search engine at the heart of the Elastic Stack that allows you to index and search unstructured content with petabytes of data. With this updated fifth edition, you'll cover comprehensive recipes relating to what's new in Elasticsearch 8.x and see how to create and run complex queries and analytics. The recipes will guide you through performing index mapping, aggregation, working with queries, and scripting using Elasticsearch. You'll focus on numerous solutions and quick techniques for performing both common and uncommon tasks such as deploying Elasticsearch nodes, using the ingest module, working with X-Pack, and creating different visualizations. As you advance, you'll learn how to manage various clusters, restore data, and install Kibana to monitor a cluster and extend it using a variety of plugins. Furthermore, you'll understand how to integrate your Java, Scala, Python, and big data applications such as Apache Spark and Pig with Elasticsearch and create efficient data applications powered by enhanced functionalities and custom plugins. By the end of this Elasticsearch cookbook, you'll have gained in-depth knowledge of implementing the Elasticsearch architecture and be able to manage, search, and store data efficiently and effectively using Elasticsearch.
Table of Contents (20 chapters)

Chapter 13: Java Integration

Elasticsearch functionalities can be easily integrated into any Java application in a couple of ways, via a REST API or via native APIs. In Java, it's easy to call a REST HTTP interface with one of the many libraries available, such as the Apache HttpComponents client (see http://hc.apache.org/ for more information). In this field, there's no such thing as the most used library; typically, developers choose the library that best suits their preferences or one that they know very well. From Elasticsearch 6.x onward, Elastic has provided a battle low-/high-level HTTP for clients to use. In version 8.x, Elastic released a modern/functional/strongly typed client and in this chapter, we will mainly use this version for all the examples that are provided.

Each Java Virtual Machine (JVM) language can also use the native protocol to integrate Elasticsearch with their applications; however, we will not cover this because it has fallen out of use from...