Book Image

Responsible AI in the Enterprise

By : Adnan Masood, Heather Dawe
5 (1)
Book Image

Responsible AI in the Enterprise

5 (1)
By: Adnan Masood, Heather Dawe

Overview of this book

Responsible AI in the Enterprise is a comprehensive guide to implementing ethical, transparent, and compliant AI systems in an organization. With a focus on understanding key concepts of machine learning models, this book equips you with techniques and algorithms to tackle complex issues such as bias, fairness, and model governance. Throughout the book, you’ll gain an understanding of FairLearn and InterpretML, along with Google What-If Tool, ML Fairness Gym, IBM AI 360 Fairness tool, and Aequitas. You’ll uncover various aspects of responsible AI, including model interpretability, monitoring and management of model drift, and compliance recommendations. You’ll gain practical insights into using AI governance tools to ensure fairness, bias mitigation, explainability, privacy compliance, and privacy in an enterprise setting. Additionally, you’ll explore interpretability toolkits and fairness measures offered by major cloud AI providers like IBM, Amazon, Google, and Microsoft, while discovering how to use FairLearn for fairness assessment and bias mitigation. You’ll also learn to build explainable models using global and local feature summary, local surrogate model, Shapley values, anchors, and counterfactual explanations. By the end of this book, you’ll be well-equipped with tools and techniques to create transparent and accountable machine learning models.
Table of Contents (16 chapters)
1
Part 1: Bigot in the Machine – A Primer
4
Part 2: Enterprise Risk Observability Model Governance
9
Part 3: Explainable AI in Action

Model Governance, Audit, and Compliance

“In this era of profound digital transformation, it’s important to remember that business, as well as government, has a role to play in creating shared prosperity – not just prosperity. After all, the same technologies that can be used to concentrate wealth and power can also be used to distribute it more widely and empower more people.”

– Erik Brynjolfsson, director of the MIT initiative on the digital economy

“Some cultures embrace privacy as the highest priority part of their culture. That’s why the U.S., Germany, and China may be at different levels in the spectrum. But I also believe fundamentally that every user does not want his or her data to be leaked or used to hurt himself or herself. I think GDPR is a very good first step, even though I might disagree with the way it was implemented and the effect it has on companies. I think governments should put a stake in the ground and say...