Book Image

Hands-On High Performance with Spring 5

By : Chintan Mehta, Subhash Shah, Pritesh Shah, Prashant Goswami, Dinesh Radadiya
Book Image

Hands-On High Performance with Spring 5

By: Chintan Mehta, Subhash Shah, Pritesh Shah, Prashant Goswami, Dinesh Radadiya

Overview of this book

While writing an application, performance is paramount. Performance tuning for real-world applications often involves activities geared toward detecting bottlenecks. The recent release of Spring 5.0 brings major advancements in the rich API provided by the Spring framework, which means developers need to master its tools and techniques to achieve high performance applications. Hands-On High Performance with Spring 5 begins with the Spring framework's core features, exploring the integration of different Spring projects. It proceeds to evaluate various Spring specifications to identify those adversely affecting performance. You will learn about bean wiring configurations, aspect-oriented programming, database interaction, and Hibernate to focus on the metrics that help identify performance bottlenecks. You will also look at application monitoring, performance optimization, JVM internals, and garbage collection optimization. Lastly, the book will show you how to leverage the microservice architecture to build a high performance and resilient application. By the end of the book, you will have gained an insight into various techniques and solutions to build and troubleshoot high performance Spring-based applications.
Table of Contents (14 chapters)

Java classical threads

Java applications execute via threads, which are an independent path of execution within a program. Any Java program has at least one thread, known as the main thread, which is created by Java Virtual Machine (JVM). Java is a multithreaded application that allows multiple thread execution at any particular time and these threads can run concurrently, either asynchronously or synchronously. When multiple threads are executing, each thread's path can differ from the other thread's paths.

The JVM provides each thread with its own stack to prevent threads from interfering with each other. Separate stacks help threads keep track of their next instructions to execute, which can differ from thread to thread. The stack also gives a thread its own copy of method parameters, local variables, and the return value.

Threads live within a process and share their...