Book Image

Game Physics Cookbook

By : Gabor Szauer
Book Image

Game Physics Cookbook

By: Gabor Szauer

Overview of this book

Physics is really important for game programmers who want to add realism and functionality to their games. Collision detection in particular is a problem that affects all game developers, regardless of the platform, engine, or toolkit they use. This book will teach you the concepts and formulas behind collision detection. You will also be taught how to build a simple physics engine, where Rigid Body physics is the main focus, and learn about intersection algorithms for primitive shapes. You’ll begin by building a strong foundation in mathematics that will be used throughout the book. We’ll guide you through implementing 2D and 3D primitives and show you how to perform effective collision tests for them. We then pivot to one of the harder areas of game development—collision detection and resolution. Further on, you will learn what a Physics engine is, how to set up a game window, and how to implement rendering. We’ll explore advanced physics topics such as constraint solving. You’ll also find out how to implement a rudimentary physics engine, which you can use to build an Angry Birds type of game or a more advanced game. By the end of the book, you will have implemented all primitive and some advanced collision tests, and you will be able to read on geometry and linear Algebra formulas to take forward to your own games!
Table of Contents (27 chapters)
Game Physics Cookbook
Credits
About the Author
Acknowledgements
About the Reviewer
Acknowledgements
www.PacktPub.com
Customer Feedback
Preface
Index

About the Reviewer

Francesco Sapio obtained his Computer Science and Control Engineering degree from Sapienza University of Rome, Italy, with a couple of semesters in advance, scoring summa cum laude. He is currently studying a Master of Science in Engineering in Artificial Intelligence and Robotics at the same university.

He is a Unity3D and Unreal expert, a skilled game designer, and an experienced user of the major graphics programs. He developed Gea2, formerly Game@School (Sapienza University of Rome), an educational game for high school students to learn the concepts of physics, and Sticker Book (series) (Dataware Games), a cross-platform series of games for kids. In addition, he worked as a consultant for the (successfully funded by Kickstarter) game Prosperity – Italy 1434 (Entertainment Game Apps, Inc.), and for the open online collaborative ideation system titled Innovoice (Sapienza University of Rome). Moreover, he has been involved in different research projects such as Belief-Driven-Pathfinding (Sapienza University of Rome), a new technique for pathfinding in videogames that was presented as a paper at the DiGRA-FDG Conference 2016; and perfekt.ID (Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology), which included developing a recommendation system for games.

He is an active writer on the topic of game development. Recently, he authored the book Getting Started with Unity 5.x 2D Game Development (Packt Publishing) which takes your hand and guides you through the amazing journey of game development, the successful Unity UI Cookbook (Packt Publishing), which has been translated into other languages and teaches readers how to develop exciting and practical user interfaces for games within Unity, and a short e-guide What do you need to know about Unity (Packt Publishing). In addition, he co-authored the book Unity 5.x 2D Game Development Blueprints (Packt Publishing). Furthermore, he has also been a reviewer for the following books: Mastering Unity 5.x (Packt Publishing), Unity 5.x by Example (Packt Publishing), and Unity Game Development Scripting (Packt Publishing).

Francesco is also a musician and a composer, especially of soundtracks for short films and video games. For several years, he worked as an actor and dancer, where he was a guest of honor at the theatre Brancaccio in Rome. In addition, he is a very active person, having volunteered as a children's entertainer at the Associazione Culturale Torraccia in Rome.

Finally, Francesco loves math, philosophy, logic, and puzzle solving, but most of all, creating video games — thanks to his passion for game designing and programming.

You can find him at www.francescosapio.com.