Book Image

EJB 3.0 Database Persistence with Oracle Fusion Middleware 11g

By : Deepak Vohra, Deepak Vohra
Book Image

EJB 3.0 Database Persistence with Oracle Fusion Middleware 11g

By: Deepak Vohra, Deepak Vohra

Overview of this book

EJB (Enterprise JavaBeans) 3.0 is a commonly used database persistence technology in Java EE applications. EJB 3.0 has simplified the development of EJBs with an annotations-based API that eliminates the use of remote/local interfaces, home/local home interfaces, and deployment descriptors. A number of other books are available on EJB 3.0, but none covers EJB 3.0 support in Oracle Fusion Middleware 11g, which is one of the leaders in the application server market.This is the first book that covers all aspects of EJB 3.0 database persistence development using Oracle Fusion Middleware technology. It covers all the best practices for database persistence ensuring that your applications are easily maintainable. Leaving theory behind, this book uses real-world examples to guide you in building your own EJB 3.0 applications that are well integrated with commonly used Java EE frameworks.The book gets going by discussing the new features in the EJB 3.0 specification. As some readers may still be using EJB 2.0, the book explains how to convert your EJB 2.0 entity beans to EJB 3.0. It then goes on to discuss using EJB 3.0 database persistence with JDeveloper, WebLogic Server, and Enterprise Pack for Eclipse, the main Java EE components of Oracle Fusion Middleware 11g. The book also covers EJB 3.0 relationships and integrating EJB 3.0 relationships with JSF user interfaces. EJB 3.0 database persistence with some of the commonly used frameworks such as ADF Faces, AJAX, and Web Services is also discussed in the book. It uses the integrated WebLogic Server 11g in some of the chapters and the standalone WebLogic Server in other chapters. While JDeveloper is the primary Java IDE used in the book, one of the chapters is based on the Oracle Enterprise Pack for Eclipse.By the time you reach the end of this book, you will be well-versed with developing EJB 3.0 applications using the different Java EE components of Oracle Fusion Middleware 11g.
Table of Contents (15 chapters)
EJB 3.0 Database Persistence with Oracle Fusion Middleware 11g
Credits
About the Author
About the Reviewers
Preface

Preface

EJB (Enterprise JavaBeans) 3.0 entity beans is a commonly used database persistence technology. EJB 3.0 has simplified the development of EJBs with an annotations-based API that does not require remote/local interfaces, home/local home interfaces, or deployment descriptors. Developing entity EJBs requires an application server and a relational database, and optionally a Java EE IDE to simplify the process of development. The objective of the JSR-000220 Enterprise JavaBeans 3.0 specification (http://jcp.org/aboutJava/communityprocess/final/jsr220/index.html) is to improve the EJB architecture by reducing its complexity from the developer's point of view. EJB 3.0 has introduced some new features, which include support for metadata annotations, default values for configuration, simplified access to environment variables, simplified session and entity beans, interceptors, enhanced support for checked exceptions, and elimination of callback interfaces.

A number of books are available on EJB 3.0, but none cover EJB 3.0 on the Oracle Fusion Middleware (11g) platform. Most of the EJB 3.0 books are GlassFish server based, which has only 10percent of the application server market. Welcome to EJB 3.0 Database Persistence with Oracle Fusion Middleware 11g, a book that will teach you how to leverage EJB 3.0 persistence on Oracle Fusion Middleware 11g. Oracle Fusion Middleware 11g includes many components such as the SOA/BPM Suite, WebCenter, and Oracle Identity Management. All of these components run on Oracle Weblogic Server 11g. The main development tool (IDE) for Oracle Fusion Middleware is Oracle JDeveloper. In respect of EJB 3.0, JDeveloper provides wizard support to reverse engineer database tables as EJB 3.0 entity beans. JDeveloper 11g also provides a wizard for creating session beans. The JPA persistence provider used in JDeveloper 11g is the EclipseLink persistence provider. JDeveloper comes with its own embedded/integrated Weblogic Server instance, which makes it very easy to develop and test within the one environment. We shall be using the embedded WebLogic Server 11g in some of the chapters and the standalone WebLogic Server in others.

The objective of the book is to discuss the support of EJB 3.0 database persistence in Oracle Fusion Middleware 11g. While JDeveloper is the main Java IDE used in the book, one of the chapters leverages the Oracle Enterprise Pack for Eclipse. The book covers all aspects of EJB 3.0 database persistence including:

  • Creating EJB 3.0 entity beans from database tables

  • Creating session bean façades for entity beans

  • Entity beans with session beans

  • Creating EJB 3.0 entity relationships

  • Creating JSF and ADF Faces user interfaces (UIs) on top of EJB 3.0 database persistence

  • Using EJB 3.0 database persistence in combination with Ajax and web services

What this book covers

In Chapter 1, What's New in EJB 3.0, we discuss the new features in the EJB 3.0 specification, such as support for metadata annotations, default values for configuration, simplified session and entity beans, and enhanced support for checked exceptions.

In Chapter 2, Converting an EJB 2.0 Entity to an EJB, we convert an example EJB 2.0 entity bean to an EJB 3.0 entity bean. We also generate the session bean façade for the EJB 3.0 entity bean. XSLT transformation is used for converting the EJB 2.0 entity bean to an EJB 3.0 entity bean.

In Chapter 3, EclipseLink JPA Persistence Provider, we discuss the JPA framework and the EclipseLink persistence provider.

In Chapter 4, Building an EJB 3.0 Persistence Model with Oracle JDeveloper, we discuss EJB 3.0 database persistence with JDeveloper 11g, WebLogic Server 11g, and Oracle Database 10g. We create an EJB 3.0 entity bean from a database table, create a session bean façade, and finally create a JSP test client. Using the test client, we create, retrieve, and delete entity bean instances.

In Chapter 5, EJB 3.0 Persistence with Oracle Enterprise Pack for Eclipse, we discuss the same example we covered in Chapter 4, but with the Oracle Enterprise Pack for Eclipse, WebLogic Server, and the open source MySQL database, which has been acquired by Oracle.

In Chapter 6, EJB 3.0 with ADF Faces UI, we discuss using an ADF Faces client for EJB 3.0 database persistence. We create an entity bean using data input from an ADF Faces user interface (UI). Subsequently, we find an entity bean instance using data input from an ADF Faces UI.

In Chapter 7, Creating EJB 3.0 Entity Relationships, we discuss EJB 3.0 entity relationships using, as an example, three entity beans that have inter-relationships. We also discuss the significance of a fetch strategy.

In Chapter 8, EJB 3.0 Database Persistence with Ajax in the UI, we discuss EJB 3.0 database persistence in combination with Ajax in the user interface (UI). We demonstrate data validation and autocompletion with Ajax.

In Chapter 9, Using JSF with Entity Relationships, we discuss adding JSFs to EJB 3.0 database persistence to create and persist entity bean instances that have entity relationships between them.

In Chapter 10, Creating an EJB 3.0 Web Service, we create a JAX-WS Web Service from an EJB 3.0 entity bean, create a web service client, package and deploy the web service to WebLogic Server, and test the Web Service using the WebLogic console.

What you need for this book

The book is based on Oracle JDeveloper 11g Studio Edition for Windows and Oracle WebLogic Server 11g, Windows version, which are the two main components of Oracle Fusion Middleware 11g and may be downloaded from http://www.oracle.com/technology/software/products/middleware/index.html. If you have Linux installed, the book may still be used (though the source code and samples have not been tested with Linux); just download and install the Linux versions of Oracle JDeveloper 11g and Oracle WebLogic Server 11g. Slight modifications may be required with the Linux install; for example, the directory paths on Linux would be different than the Windows directory paths used in the book. For one of the chapters, you would need to download and install Oracle Enterprise pack for Eclipse from http://www.oracle.com/tools/enterprise-eclipse-pack.html. For database, you would need to download and install Oracle Database 10g/11g from http://www.oracle.com/technology/software/products/database/index.html. For another chapter, you would need to download and install the open source MySQL 5.x database from http://www.mysql.com/downloads/mysql/. The annotations used in EJB 3.0 are a J2SE 5.0 feature; therefore, you need to install J2SE 5.0 or later.

Who this book is for

The target audience of the book is EJB 3.0 application developers who want to learn about the practical use of EJB 3.0 database persistence with Oracle Fusion Middleware 11g. Those who are already using EJB 3.0 database persistence will learn about using EJB 3.0 database persistence with Oracle Fusion Middleware 11g. We won't be discussing the EJB 3.0 specification in much detail but you can refer - JSR-000220 (http://jcp.org/aboutJava/communityprocess/final/jsr220/index.html) for more information. This book is suitable for professional Java EE developers. The book is also suitable for an intermediate/advanced level course in EJB 3.0. The target audience is expected to have prior, albeit beginner's, knowledge about Java EE, EJBs, EJB 3.0, JSF, ADF Faces, Ajax, Web Services, and XML. The book also requires some familiarity with WebLogic Server and Java EE IDEs, JDeveloper, and Eclipse.

Conventions

In this book, you will find a number of styles of text that distinguish between different kinds of information. Here are some examples of these styles, and an explanation of their meaning.

Code words in text are shown as follows: "The Catalog entity bean has properties id and journal".

A block of code is set as follows:

@Resources({
@Resource(name="ds1", type="javax.sql.DataSource"),
@Resource(name="ds2", type="javax.sql.DataSource")
})

New terms and important words are shown in bold. Words that you see on the screen, in menus or dialog boxes for example, appear in the text like this: "In the New Gallery window, select Categories:General | XML and Items:XSL Style Sheet and click on OK".

Note

Warnings or important notes appear in a box like this.

Note

Tips and tricks appear like this.

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