Book Image

CompTIA PenTest+ Study Guide

By : Mike Chapple, David Seidl
Book Image

CompTIA PenTest+ Study Guide

By: Mike Chapple, David Seidl

Overview of this book

The CompTIA PenTest+ Study Guide: Exam PT0-001 offers comprehensive preparation for the newest intermediate cybersecurity certification exam. With expert coverage of Exam PT0-001 objectives, this book is your ideal companion throughout all stages of study; whether you’re just embarking on your certification journey or finalizing preparations for the big day, this invaluable resource helps you solidify your understanding of essential skills and concepts. The book shows how to perform security assessments on desktops, mobile devices, cloud, IoT, as well as industrial and embedded systems. You'll learn how to identify security weaknesses and manage system vulnerabilities. As you progress, you'll learn methods to ensure that existing cybersecurity practices, configurations, and policies conform with current best practices. You'll assess your knowledge by simulating cyber attacks to pinpoint security weaknesses in operating systems, networks, and applications. By the end of the book, you'll have all the resources you need to prepare for the exam - identify what you already know, learn what you don’t know, and face the exam with full confidence.
Table of Contents (21 chapters)
Free Chapter
1
Acknowledgments
2
About the Authors
3
Introduction
4
Assessment Test
5
Answers to Assessment Test
18
Index
19
Advert
20
End User License Agreement

Chapter 11
Scripting for Penetration Testing

THIS CHAPTER COVERS THE FOLLOWING COMPTIA PENTEST+ EXAM OBJECTIVES:

Domain 4: Penetration Testing Tools

  • images 4.4 Given a scenario, analyze a basic script (limited to Bash, Python, Ruby, and PowerShell).
    • Logic
      • Looping
      • Flow Control
    • I/O
      • File vs. terminal vs. network
    • Substitutions
    • Variables
    • Common operations
      • String operations
      • Comparisons
    • Error handling
    • Arrays
    • Encoding/Decoding

imagesPenetration testing is full of tedious work. From scanning large networks to brute-force testing of web application credentials, penetration testers often use extremely repetitive processes to achieve their goals. Done manually, this work would be so time-consuming and mind-numbing that it would be virtually impossible to execute. Fortunately, scripting languages provide a means to automate these repetitive tasks.

Penetration testers do not need to be software engineers. Generally speaking, pen-testers don’t write extremely lengthy code or develop...