Book Image

Visualize This

By : Nathan Yau‚ÄØ
Book Image

Visualize This

By: Nathan Yau‚ÄØ

Overview of this book

Visualize This is a guide on how to visualize and tell stories with data, providing practical design tips complemented with step-by-step tutorials. It begins with a description of the huge growth of data and visualization in industry, news, and gov't and opportunities for those who tell stories with data. Logically it moves on to actual stories in data-statistical ones with trends and human stories. the technical part comes up quickly with how to gather, parse and format data with Python, R, Excel, Google docs, and so on, and details tools to visualize data-native graphics for the Web like ActionScript, Flash libraries, PHP, JavaScript, CSS, HTML. Every chapter provides an example as well. Patterns over time and kinds of data charts are followed by proportions, chart types and examples. Next, examples and descriptions of outliers and how to show them, different kinds of maps, how to guide your readers and explain the data "in the visualization". The book ends with a value-add appendix on graphical perception.
Table of Contents (12 chapters)

Learning Data

I got my start in statistics during my freshman year in college. It was a required introductory course toward my unrelated electrical engineering degree. Unlike some of the horror stories I’ve heard, my professor was extremely enthusiastic about his teaching and clearly enjoyed the topic. He quickly walked up and down the stairs of the lecture hall as he taught. He waved his hands wildly as he spoke and got students involved as he walked by. To this day, I don’t think I’ve ever had such an excited teacher or professor, and it’s undoubtedly something that drew me into the area of data and eventually what led to graduate school in statistics four years later.

Through all my undergraduate studies, statistics was data analysis, distributions, and hypothesis testing, and I enjoyed it. It was fun looking at a dataset and finding trends, patterns, and correlations. When I started graduate school though, my views changed, and things got even more interesting...