Book Image

Hands-On Functional Programming in RUST

By : Andrew Johnson
Book Image

Hands-On Functional Programming in RUST

By: Andrew Johnson

Overview of this book

Functional programming allows developers to divide programs into smaller, reusable components that ease the creation, testing, and maintenance of software as a whole. Combined with the power of Rust, you can develop robust and scalable applications that fulfill modern day software requirements. This book will help you discover all the Rust features that can be used to build software in a functional way. We begin with a brief comparison of the functional and object-oriented approach to different problems and patterns. We then quickly look at the patterns of control flow, data the abstractions of these unique to functional programming. The next part covers how to create functional apps in Rust; mutability and ownership, which are exclusive to Rust, are also discussed. Pure functions are examined next and you'll master closures, their various types, and currying. We also look at implementing concurrency through functional design principles and metaprogramming using macros. Finally, we look at best practices for debugging and optimization. By the end of the book, you will be familiar with the functional approach of programming and will be able to use these techniques on a daily basis.
Table of Contents (12 chapters)

Summary

In this chapter, we explored the basic and deeper concepts of generic and parameterized programming. We learned how to add lifetime, type, and trait parameters to declarations of types, traits, functions, and implementations. We also examined advanced techniques to selectively preserve or obscure type information as desired.

Applying these concepts to the elevator simulation, we observed how parameterization and generics can create fully abstract interfaces. By using trait objects, it is possible to completely separate trait interfaces from any implementation. We also observed the downsides or difficulties of parameterization and generics. Excessive use of parameterization can lead to parameter leaks, potentially requiring all code that interfaces with an interface to also become parameterized itself. On the other hand, we observed the difficulty associated with erasing...