Book Image

PostgreSQL 10 Administration Cookbook - Fourth Edition

By : Simon Riggs, Gianni Ciolli
Book Image

PostgreSQL 10 Administration Cookbook - Fourth Edition

By: Simon Riggs, Gianni Ciolli

Overview of this book

PostgreSQL is a powerful, open source database management system with an enviable reputation for high performance and stability. With many new features in its arsenal, PostgreSQL 10 allows users to scale up their PostgreSQL infrastructure. This book takes a step-by-step, recipe-based approach to effective PostgreSQL administration. Throughout this book, you will be introduced to these new features such as logical replication, native table partitioning, additional query parallelism, and much more. You will learn how to tackle a variety of problems that are basically the pain points for any database administrator - from creating tables to managing views, from improving performance to securing your database. More importantly, the book pays special attention to topics such as monitoring roles, backup, and recovery of your PostgreSQL 10 database, ensuring high availability, concurrency, and replication. By the end of this book, you will know everything you need to know to be the go-to PostgreSQL expert in your organization.
Table of Contents (14 chapters)

Removing old prepared transactions

You may have been routed here from other recipes, so you might not even know what prepared transactions are, let alone what an old prepared transaction looks like.

The good news is that prepared transactions don't just happen; they happen in certain situations. If you don't know what I'm talking about, it's OK! You won't need to, and better still, you probably don't have any prepared transactions either.

Prepared transactions are part of the two-phase commit feature, also known as 2PC. A transaction commits in two stages rather than one, allowing multiple databases to have synchronized commits. Its typical use is to combine multiple so-called resource managers using the XA protocol, usually provided by a Transaction Manager (TM), as used by the Java Transaction API (JTA) and others. If none of this meant anything...