Book Image

Hands-On Domain-Driven Design with .NET Core

By : Alexey Zimarev
5 (1)
Book Image

Hands-On Domain-Driven Design with .NET Core

5 (1)
By: Alexey Zimarev

Overview of this book

Developers across the world are rapidly adopting DDD principles to deliver powerful results when writing software that deals with complex business requirements. This book will guide you in involving business stakeholders when choosing the software you are planning to build for them. By figuring out the temporal nature of behavior-driven domain models, you will be able to build leaner, more agile, and modular systems. You’ll begin by uncovering domain complexity and learn how to capture the behavioral aspects of the domain language. You will then learn about EventStorming and advance to creating a new project in .NET Core 2.1; you’ll also and write some code to transfer your events from sticky notes to C#. The book will show you how to use aggregates to handle commands and produce events. As you progress, you’ll get to grips with Bounded Contexts, Context Map, Event Sourcing, and CQRS. After translating domain models into executable C# code, you will create a frontend for your application using Vue.js. In addition to this, you’ll learn how to refactor your code and cover event versioning and migration essentials. By the end of this DDD book, you will have gained the confidence to implement the DDD approach in your organization and be able to explore new techniques that complement what you’ve learned from the book.
Table of Contents (14 chapters)

Domain model

As we discussed in Chapter 1, Why Domain-Driven Design?, the software we design and implement has only one primary purpose—to solve a domain problem. Understanding the problem space or the business domain is crucial for the journey of finding proper solutions and satisfying users with the systems we make. When we get more understanding about the domain using techniques such as Big Picture EventStorming, as discussed in the previous chapter, we need to go a bit deeper and try visualizing our knowledge using visual artifacts that other people would understand and will be able to reason about. In short, we need a model.

What does the model represent?

There are many different things described by the word model...