Book Image

OpenStreetMap

Book Image

OpenStreetMap

Overview of this book

Imagine being able to create accurate maps that look how you want them to, and use them on the Web or in print, for free. OpenStreetMap allows exactly that, with no restrictions on how or where you use your maps. OpenStreetMap is perfect for businesses that want to include maps on their website or in publications without paying high fees. With this book in hand you have the power to make, alter, and use this geographical data in a collaborative way from anywhere on the Earth.OpenStreetMap was started because most maps you think of as free actually have legal or technical restrictions on their use, holding back people from using them in creative, productive, or unexpected ways. This book will allow you to take control of your own maps and use them smoothly. This book introduces the reader to the OpenStreetMap project and shows you how to participate in the project, and make use of the data it provides. No prior knowledge of the project is assumed, and technical details are kept to a minimum.In this book, you'll learn how easy it is to add your neighborhood to OpenStreetMap using inexpensive GPS equipment, or even no GPS at all. You'll find out how to communicate with other mappers working in the same area, and where to find more information about how to map the world around you.Once you have your area mapped, you'll learn how to turn this information into maps, whether for use in print or online, large or small, and with the details you want shown. The book describes several rendering methods, each suited to different types of map, and takes you through a tutorial on each one.
Table of Contents (17 chapters)
OpenStreetMap
Credits
About the Author
About the Reviewers
Preface
4
How OpenStreetMap Records Geographical Features
Index

Chapter 5. OpenStreetMap's Editing Applications

After you've gathered GPS traces, taken photos, written or spoken notes, and otherwise recorded surveyed information, it's time to turn it into data in the OpenStreetMap database. The normal way of doing this is using one of the editing applications available, each of which has its own strengths:

  • Potlatch— the web-based editor

  • JOSM— a Java-based desktop editor

  • Merkaartor— a desktop editing application

Although most mappers find which editor suits them best and tend to stick to it, they're not all suitable for use under all circumstances, so it's best to be familiar with more than one. Here's a quick run-down of the differences between the editors:

 

Potlatch

JOSM

Merkaartor

Requirements

Web browser with Flash (or compatible) plugin

Any operating system with Java SE 1.5 or higher

Windows, Linux, or Mac OS X with Qt

Works while offline?

No

Yes

Yes

Needs installing?

No

No

Yes

Supports photo mapping?

Partially

Yes

Yes...