Book Image

Learning Android Forensics, - Second Edition

By : Donnie Tindall, Rohit Tamma
Book Image

Learning Android Forensics, - Second Edition

By: Donnie Tindall, Rohit Tamma

Overview of this book

Many forensic examiners rely on commercial, push-button tools to retrieve and analyze data, even though there is no tool that does either of these jobs perfectly. Learning Android Forensics will introduce you to the most up-to-date Android platform and its architecture, and provide a high-level overview of what Android forensics entails. You will understand how data is stored on Android devices and how to set up a digital forensic examination environment. As you make your way through the chapters, you will work through various physical and logical techniques to extract data from devices in order to obtain forensic evidence. You will also learn how to recover deleted data and forensically analyze application data with the help of various open source and commercial tools. In the concluding chapters, you will explore malware analysis so that you’ll be able to investigate cybersecurity incidents involving Android malware. By the end of this book, you will have a complete understanding of the Android forensic process, you will have explored open source and commercial forensic tools, and will have basic skills of Android malware identification and analysis.
Table of Contents (12 chapters)

Physical extraction overview

In digital forensics, a physical extraction is an exact bit-for-bit image of the electronic media, and this definition remains true for mobile devices. In traditional computer forensics, this typically involves removing the evidence drive from the suspect's computer and imaging it via a write-blocker without ever booting the drive, resulting in an image file containing an exact copy of the suspect's drive. The output is frequently referred to as a raw image, or simply a binary (.bin) file. Physical extractions differ from logical ones in that they are exact copies of the device's memory, and include unallocated space, file slack, volume slack, and so on.

In mobile forensics, the result is the same—an exact bit-for-bit image of the device—but the methods are somewhat different. For example, removing the flash memory from...