Book Image

Learning ServiceNow. - Second Edition

5 (1)
Book Image

Learning ServiceNow. - Second Edition

5 (1)

Overview of this book

This book is an updated version of Learning ServiceNow, that will cover the new and updated features of the ServiceNow platform. It will show you how to put important ServiceNow features to work in the real world, while introducing key concepts via examples of managing and automating IT services. It'll help you build a solid foundation of knowledge, and will demonstrate how to effectively implement and configure modules within ServiceNow. We'll show you how to configure and administer your instance, and then move on to building strong user interfaces and creating powerful workflows. We also cover other key elements of ServiceNow, such as notifications, security, reporting, and custom development. You will learn how to improve and automate your business' workflow and processes. By the end of this book, you will be able to successfully configure and manage ServiceNow like a pro.
Table of Contents (19 chapters)
Learning ServiceNow Second Edition
Contributors
Preface
Index

Creating Task fields


One thing that's important to understand about tasks in ServiceNow, is that all task records (whether they're changes, problems, incidents, requests, request items, catalog tasks, or tasks in any other table that extends the base system Task [task] table) are technically all stored in a single database table. Although in ServiceNow, you see them as separate tables, that isn't actually the case. This is due to the flattening of the task table.

Each task-extending table has a field called Task type [sys_class_name], which defines what type of task it is (problem, change, incident, and so on.) by containing the name (not label) of the table that it's in (incident, problem, change_request, sc_req_item, and so on.). ServiceNow groups records with the same Task type, and treats them as though they're all in separate tables, but in the physical database on ServiceNow's servers, they're technically all in one big table. This is one of the reasons that tables that extend other...