Book Image

Learning ServiceNow. - Second Edition

5 (1)
Book Image

Learning ServiceNow. - Second Edition

5 (1)

Overview of this book

This book is an updated version of Learning ServiceNow, that will cover the new and updated features of the ServiceNow platform. It will show you how to put important ServiceNow features to work in the real world, while introducing key concepts via examples of managing and automating IT services. It'll help you build a solid foundation of knowledge, and will demonstrate how to effectively implement and configure modules within ServiceNow. We'll show you how to configure and administer your instance, and then move on to building strong user interfaces and creating powerful workflows. We also cover other key elements of ServiceNow, such as notifications, security, reporting, and custom development. You will learn how to improve and automate your business' workflow and processes. By the end of this book, you will be able to successfully configure and manage ServiceNow like a pro.
Table of Contents (19 chapters)
Learning ServiceNow Second Edition
Contributors
Preface
Index

The structure of an API class


First, let's define a few terms. According to Mozilla's object-oriented JavaScript documentation, JavaScript is really a classless language. However, class syntax was added on top of the language, so in JavaScript, a class is sort of like a template for an object. A class is technically an object as well. A class definition pre-defines the methods and properties of an object generated from the class. Most experienced JavaScript developers will be familiar with a similar concept: object prototypes.

An object therefore, in this context, is simply an instance of a class! These classes are only slightly different from the prototype constructors you're probably familiar with, and instances of these classes are generated in the same way as with prototypal notation: using the new keyword.

var grIncident = new GlideRecord('incident');

A method is a function or subroutine that's declared as part of a class (and any objects that are instances of that class).

A constructor...