Book Image

Rust Standard Library Cookbook

By : Jan Hohenheim, Daniel Durante
Book Image

Rust Standard Library Cookbook

By: Jan Hohenheim, Daniel Durante

Overview of this book

Mozilla’s Rust is gaining much attention with amazing features and a powerful library. This book will take you through varied recipes to teach you how to leverage the Standard library to implement efficient solutions. The book begins with a brief look at the basic modules of the Standard library and collections. From here, the recipes will cover packages that support file/directory handling and interaction through parsing. You will learn about packages related to advanced data structures, error handling, and networking. You will also learn to work with futures and experimental nightly features. The book also covers the most relevant external crates in Rust. By the end of the book, you will be proficient at using the Rust Standard library.
Table of Contents (12 chapters)

Introduction

Rust provides a very broad set of collections to use. We will look at most of them, see how they're used, discuss how they're implemented, and when to use and choose them. A big part of this chapter focuses on iterators. Much of Rust's flexibility comes from them, as all collections (and more!) can be used as iterators. Learning how to use them is crucial.

Throughout this chapter, we are going to use the big O notation to show how effective certain algorithms are. In case you don't know it yet, it is a way of telling how much longer an algorithm takes when working with more elements. Let's look at it briefly.

means that an algorithm is going to take the same time, no matter how much data is stored in a collection. It doesn't tell us how fast exactly it is, just that it's not going to slow down with size. This is the realistic ideal for a function. A practical example for this is accessing the first number in an infinite list of numbers...