Book Image

Rust Standard Library Cookbook

By : Jan Hohenheim, Daniel Durante
Book Image

Rust Standard Library Cookbook

By: Jan Hohenheim, Daniel Durante

Overview of this book

Mozilla’s Rust is gaining much attention with amazing features and a powerful library. This book will take you through varied recipes to teach you how to leverage the Standard library to implement efficient solutions. The book begins with a brief look at the basic modules of the Standard library and collections. From here, the recipes will cover packages that support file/directory handling and interaction through parsing. You will learn about packages related to advanced data structures, error handling, and networking. You will also learn to work with futures and experimental nightly features. The book also covers the most relevant external crates in Rust. By the end of the book, you will be proficient at using the Rust Standard library.
Table of Contents (12 chapters)

How it works...

To demonstrate how to read and write a binary file, we will create a little custom binary protocol. It will start with what is called a magic number, that is, a certain hardcoded value. Our magic number will be the binary representation of the MyProtocol string. We can put a b before the string to tell Rust that we want the text to be represented as a binary slice (&[u8]) instead of a string slice(&str) [26].

Many protocols and files start with magic numbers to indicate what they are. For example, the internal headers of .zip files start with the magic hex numbers 0x50 and 0x4B. These represent the initials PH in ASCII, which is short for the name of its creator Phil Katz. Another example would be PDF; it starts with 0x25, 0x50, 0x44, and 0x46, which stands for PDF%, followed by a version number.

Afterward, we follow it by the binary representation of either LE or BE to tell the reader the endianness of the rest of the data [31]. Finally, we have the...