Book Image

Extreme C

By : Kamran Amini
5 (1)
Book Image

Extreme C

5 (1)
By: Kamran Amini

Overview of this book

There’s a lot more to C than knowing the language syntax. The industry looks for developers with a rigorous, scientific understanding of the principles and practices. Extreme C will teach you to use C’s advanced low-level power to write effective, efficient systems. This intensive, practical guide will help you become an expert C programmer. Building on your existing C knowledge, you will master preprocessor directives, macros, conditional compilation, pointers, and much more. You will gain new insight into algorithm design, functions, and structures. You will discover how C helps you squeeze maximum performance out of critical, resource-constrained applications. C still plays a critical role in 21st-century programming, remaining the core language for precision engineering, aviations, space research, and more. This book shows how C works with Unix, how to implement OO principles in C, and fully covers multi-processing. In Extreme C, Amini encourages you to think, question, apply, and experiment for yourself. The book is essential for anybody who wants to take their C to the next level.
Table of Contents (23 chapters)

Processes and threads

Throughout this book, we are mainly interested in task scheduling within computer systems. In an operating system, tasks are either processes or threads. We'll explain them and their differences in the upcoming chapters, but for now, you should know that most operating systems treat both in basically the same way: as some tasks that need to be executed concurrently.

An operating system needs to use a task scheduler to share the CPU cores among the many tasks, be they processes or threads, that are willing to use the CPU for their execution. When a new process or a new thread is created, it enters the scheduler queue as a new task, and it waits to obtain a CPU core before it starts running.

In cases in which a time-sharing or preemptive scheduler is in place, if the task cannot finish its logic in a certain amount of time, then the CPU core will be taken back forcefully by the task scheduler and the task enters the queue again, just like in...